Effect of carbohydrate and caffeine ingestion on badminton performance

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Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to investigate the effect of ingesting carbohydrate and caffeine solutions on measures that are central to success in badminton. METHODS: Twelve male badminton players performed a badminton serve accuracy test, coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) and a choice reaction time sprint test 60 min before exercise. Participants then consumed 7 ml·kg body mass-1 of either water (PLA), 6.4% carbohydrate solution (CHO), a solution containing a caffeine dose of 4 mg·kg-1 (CAF) or 6.4% carbohydrate and 4 mg·kg-1 caffeine (C+C). All solutions were flavoured with orange-flavoured concentrate. During the 33 min fatigue protocol, participants were provided with an additional 3 ml·kg body mass-1 of solution, which was ingested before the end of the protocol. As soon as the 33 min fatigue protocol was completed, all measures were recorded again. RESULTS: Short serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of CHO and C+C compared with PLA (P=0.001; ηp2 =0.50). Long serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of C+C compared with PLA (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-115
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Racquet Sports
Caffeine
Eating
Carbohydrates
Fatigue
Water

Bibliographical note

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. As accepted for publication.

Keywords

  • fatiguing exercise
  • hydration
  • physical performance
  • motor control

Cite this

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title = "Effect of carbohydrate and caffeine ingestion on badminton performance",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to investigate the effect of ingesting carbohydrate and caffeine solutions on measures that are central to success in badminton. METHODS: Twelve male badminton players performed a badminton serve accuracy test, coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) and a choice reaction time sprint test 60 min before exercise. Participants then consumed 7 ml·kg body mass-1 of either water (PLA), 6.4{\%} carbohydrate solution (CHO), a solution containing a caffeine dose of 4 mg·kg-1 (CAF) or 6.4{\%} carbohydrate and 4 mg·kg-1 caffeine (C+C). All solutions were flavoured with orange-flavoured concentrate. During the 33 min fatigue protocol, participants were provided with an additional 3 ml·kg body mass-1 of solution, which was ingested before the end of the protocol. As soon as the 33 min fatigue protocol was completed, all measures were recorded again. RESULTS: Short serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of CHO and C+C compared with PLA (P=0.001; ηp2 =0.50). Long serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of C+C compared with PLA (P",
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T1 - Effect of carbohydrate and caffeine ingestion on badminton performance

AU - Clarke, Neil

AU - Duncan, Michael J.

N1 - © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. As accepted for publication.

PY - 2015

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N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to investigate the effect of ingesting carbohydrate and caffeine solutions on measures that are central to success in badminton. METHODS: Twelve male badminton players performed a badminton serve accuracy test, coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) and a choice reaction time sprint test 60 min before exercise. Participants then consumed 7 ml·kg body mass-1 of either water (PLA), 6.4% carbohydrate solution (CHO), a solution containing a caffeine dose of 4 mg·kg-1 (CAF) or 6.4% carbohydrate and 4 mg·kg-1 caffeine (C+C). All solutions were flavoured with orange-flavoured concentrate. During the 33 min fatigue protocol, participants were provided with an additional 3 ml·kg body mass-1 of solution, which was ingested before the end of the protocol. As soon as the 33 min fatigue protocol was completed, all measures were recorded again. RESULTS: Short serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of CHO and C+C compared with PLA (P=0.001; ηp2 =0.50). Long serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of C+C compared with PLA (P

AB - PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to investigate the effect of ingesting carbohydrate and caffeine solutions on measures that are central to success in badminton. METHODS: Twelve male badminton players performed a badminton serve accuracy test, coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) and a choice reaction time sprint test 60 min before exercise. Participants then consumed 7 ml·kg body mass-1 of either water (PLA), 6.4% carbohydrate solution (CHO), a solution containing a caffeine dose of 4 mg·kg-1 (CAF) or 6.4% carbohydrate and 4 mg·kg-1 caffeine (C+C). All solutions were flavoured with orange-flavoured concentrate. During the 33 min fatigue protocol, participants were provided with an additional 3 ml·kg body mass-1 of solution, which was ingested before the end of the protocol. As soon as the 33 min fatigue protocol was completed, all measures were recorded again. RESULTS: Short serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of CHO and C+C compared with PLA (P=0.001; ηp2 =0.50). Long serve accuracy was improved following the ingestion of C+C compared with PLA (P

KW - fatiguing exercise

KW - hydration

KW - physical performance

KW - motor control

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JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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SN - 1555-0265

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