Eating like you are overweight: the effect of overweight models on food intake in a remote confederate study

Eric Robinson, Maxine Sharps, Nicola Price, Rebecca Dallas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is consistent evidence that people model the eating behaviour of others. The extent to which people model the amount of food consumed by other people of different weight statuses has received less attention. Here we tested the effect on food consumption of exposing female participants to information about the food consumption of either normal/healthy weight or overweight individuals. Eighty female participants took part in a between-subjects experiment, in which we used a remote-confederate design and manipulated whether participants saw intake information about normal/healthy weight or overweight previous participants (remote confederates). Regardless of the weight-status of the remote confederates, participants ate more food when they believed that previous participants had eaten a large amount of food, in comparison with when they believed previous participants had eaten a smaller amount of food. These findings indicate that women may model the food intake of other women, even when they believe they are of a different weight status to themselves.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalAppetite
Volume82
Issue number1
Early online date18 Jul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Intake norms
  • Social influence
  • Informational influence

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