Early predictors of phonological and morphological awareness and the link with reading: Evidence from children with different patterns of early deficit

Anna J. Cunningham, Julia M. Carroll

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    15 Citations (Scopus)
    46 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This study examines the contribution of early phonological processing (PP) and language skills on later phonological awareness (PA) and morphological awareness (MA), as well as the links among PA, MA, and reading. Children 4–6 years of age with poor PP at the start of school showed weaker PA and MA 3 years later (age 7–9), regardless of their language skills. PA and phonological and morphological strategies predict reading accuracy, whereas MA predicts reading comprehension. Our findings suggest that children with poor early PP are more at risk of developing deficits in MA and PA than children with poor language. They also suggest that there is a direct link between PA and reading accuracy and between MA and reading comprehension that cannot be accounted for by strategy use at the word level. Publisher statement: The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)509-531
    JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
    Volume36
    Issue number3
    Early online date25 Jul 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2015

    Bibliographical note

    The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

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