Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study

Cyriel Diels, N. Reed, L. Weaver

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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Abstract

This study was designed to investigate two hypotheses about typical driving behaviours: (1) the majority of motorists engage in behaviours that could be considered unsafe, on a daily basis. These behaviours include unsafe in-vehicle activities (e.g. driving with one hand on the steering wheel, eating/drinking/smoking, using a mobile phone, interacting with systems) and unsafe driving techniques (e.g. speeding, failure to check mirrors / blind-spots, tailgating); and (2) these unsafe behaviours may be, at least partly, due to social pressure; for example, strict compliance to the Highway Code is avoided in the belief that this may provoke frustration on behalf of other road users.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWokingham, Berkshire
PublisherTransport Research Laboratory
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Mobile phones
Wheels
Compliance

Keywords

  • driving behaviours
  • safety

Cite this

Diels, C., Reed, N., & Weaver, L. (2009). Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study. Wokingham, Berkshire: Transport Research Laboratory.

Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study. / Diels, Cyriel; Reed, N.; Weaver, L.

Wokingham, Berkshire : Transport Research Laboratory, 2009.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Diels, C, Reed, N & Weaver, L 2009, Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study. Transport Research Laboratory, Wokingham, Berkshire.
Diels C, Reed N, Weaver L. Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study. Wokingham, Berkshire: Transport Research Laboratory, 2009.
Diels, Cyriel ; Reed, N. ; Weaver, L. / Drivers’ attitudes to distraction and other motorists’ behaviour: a focus group and observational study. Wokingham, Berkshire : Transport Research Laboratory, 2009.
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