Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services

Malcolm Fisk, Gina Sands, Darren Awang, Gill Ward, Emm Rose-Hayes, Simon Fielden

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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Abstract

This five year Workforce Learning Strategy (the Strategy) for Electronic Assistive Technology (EAT)1 offers a UK-wide approach to the development of EAT-related learning opportunities in social care. It is concerned, therefore, with the provision of care, guidance and support of children and adults. The Strategy is concerned not just with personal care and support for adults and children in relation to day to day living, but also to people’s involvement and engagement in family and in economic and social activity. Such care and support promotes people’s personal independence. It provides a vision for action that will, by 2018, stimulate wider usage of EAT among users and carers, and supports radical change in the way in which many social care services are provided. The vision is one that sees both increased knowledge and use of EAT by social care staff. The term ‘social care staff’ is used throughout this document for ease of reading. Examples of typical social care job types are provided in Appendix 1. It includes those who work with children and young people as well as adults. It becomes apparent in this Strategy that the learning required by social care staff is also, in large part, transferable to contingent parts of the workforce (e.g. in health and housing). Therefore it is important to note that this document will also be relevant to many outside of social care. It is also relevant to staff who are involved in managing or commissioning EAT related services
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherSkills for Care and Development
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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learning strategy
electronics
staff
learning
housing
health

Bibliographical note

This draft report for 2013-2018 is in draft form and was produced in June 2013. It is freely available at http://www.skillsforcareanddevelopment.org.uk

Keywords

  • Electronic assistive technologies. social care services

Cite this

Fisk, M., Sands, G., Awang, D., Ward, G., Rose-Hayes, E., & Fielden, S. (2013). Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services. London: Skills for Care and Development.

Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services. / Fisk, Malcolm; Sands, Gina; Awang, Darren; Ward, Gill; Rose-Hayes, Emm; Fielden, Simon.

London : Skills for Care and Development, 2013.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Fisk, M, Sands, G, Awang, D, Ward, G, Rose-Hayes, E & Fielden, S 2013, Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services. Skills for Care and Development, London.
Fisk M, Sands G, Awang D, Ward G, Rose-Hayes E, Fielden S. Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services. London: Skills for Care and Development, 2013.
Fisk, Malcolm ; Sands, Gina ; Awang, Darren ; Ward, Gill ; Rose-Hayes, Emm ; Fielden, Simon. / Draft 2013-2018 workforce learning strategy to support the embedding of electronic assistive technologies in social care services. London : Skills for Care and Development, 2013.
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