Do the dark triad and self-perceived mate value predict intention to mate poach?

Ezgi Erik, Manpal Singh Bhogal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although much research has been conducted on the psychology of mate poaching, little research has been conducted on the factors that predict intention to mate poach, from the perspective of the poacher. Recent research has paid some attention to the role of the dark triads in mate poaching. However, very little research has been conducted investigating the relationship between self-perceived mate value and intention to mate poach. We explored the role of the dark triads (Machiavellianism, narcissism and psychopathy), self-perceived mate value, and gender on one’s intention to mate poach in 81 participants from Coventry University. We find that the only dark triad to significantly predict intention to mate poach was psychopathy, suggesting those who scored higher on psychopathic traits were more likely to mate poach. Furthermore, we find that self-perceived mate value significantly predicted intention to mate poach, suggesting those who perceive themselves as having a high mate value, are likely to engage in mate poaching, which is a novel finding.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
JournalLetters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2016

Bibliographical note

The full text is available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.5178/lebs.2016.50

Keywords

  • mate poaching
  • dark triad
  • mate value

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