Do South Asian Communities ‘Act FAST’?

Dawn Coleby, Nick Taub, Amit Mistri, Andy Turner, Jane Coad, Petra Wark, Krishna Bhatti, Kusminder Chahal, Wei-Peng Teo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Rapid medical assessment and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke significantly reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. Previous research has shown that delays to initial medical assessment are due to lack of an urgent response to symptoms. In comparison to other communities living within the UK, South Asians have a higher risk of stroke/TIA. Therefore, it is critically important to explore stroke/TIA knowledge and anticipated response to symptoms, within this community.

Aim This study aims to provide preliminary evidence of stroke knowledge and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign in the South Asian community and to provide evidence of successful participant recruitment from ‘hard to engage’ groups.

Method A pilot mixed methods study, incorporating focus group discussions and a short ‘tick box’ style paper survey, designed to assess and explore participant knowledge of stroke/TIA symptoms, and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign. Barriers and facilitators to stroke education and the suitability of mass-media campaigns are also discussed during the focus groups. All participants were recruited from places of worship.

Results The authors will present highlights from the ‘on-going’ study including; the recruitment strategy, barriers and facilitators to recruitment in Sikh temples and preliminary findings from 68 completed surveys. Highlights from the focus group discussions will be presented, alongside participant suggested methods to improve stroke/TIA knowledge in Indian communities.

Conclusion Preliminary findings suggest awareness of stroke symptoms in the Indian community, but less awareness of TIA. Non-English speakers may be less aware of ‘Act FAST’.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)bjgp19X702989
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume69
Issue numbersuppl 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

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Stroke
Transient Ischemic Attack
Focus Groups
Mass Media
Ticks
Education
Research

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Do South Asian Communities ‘Act FAST’? / Coleby, Dawn; Taub, Nick; Mistri, Amit; Turner, Andy; Coad, Jane; Wark, Petra; Bhatti, Krishna; Chahal, Kusminder; Teo, Wei-Peng.

In: British Journal of General Practice, Vol. 69, No. suppl 1, 06.2019, p. bjgp19X702989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coleby, D, Taub, N, Mistri, A, Turner, A, Coad, J, Wark, P, Bhatti, K, Chahal, K & Teo, W-P 2019, 'Do South Asian Communities ‘Act FAST’?' British Journal of General Practice, vol. 69, no. suppl 1, pp. bjgp19X702989. https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgp19x702989
Coleby, Dawn ; Taub, Nick ; Mistri, Amit ; Turner, Andy ; Coad, Jane ; Wark, Petra ; Bhatti, Krishna ; Chahal, Kusminder ; Teo, Wei-Peng. / Do South Asian Communities ‘Act FAST’?. In: British Journal of General Practice. 2019 ; Vol. 69, No. suppl 1. pp. bjgp19X702989.
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abstract = "Background Rapid medical assessment and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke significantly reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. Previous research has shown that delays to initial medical assessment are due to lack of an urgent response to symptoms. In comparison to other communities living within the UK, South Asians have a higher risk of stroke/TIA. Therefore, it is critically important to explore stroke/TIA knowledge and anticipated response to symptoms, within this community.Aim This study aims to provide preliminary evidence of stroke knowledge and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign in the South Asian community and to provide evidence of successful participant recruitment from ‘hard to engage’ groups.Method A pilot mixed methods study, incorporating focus group discussions and a short ‘tick box’ style paper survey, designed to assess and explore participant knowledge of stroke/TIA symptoms, and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign. Barriers and facilitators to stroke education and the suitability of mass-media campaigns are also discussed during the focus groups. All participants were recruited from places of worship.Results The authors will present highlights from the ‘on-going’ study including; the recruitment strategy, barriers and facilitators to recruitment in Sikh temples and preliminary findings from 68 completed surveys. Highlights from the focus group discussions will be presented, alongside participant suggested methods to improve stroke/TIA knowledge in Indian communities.Conclusion Preliminary findings suggest awareness of stroke symptoms in the Indian community, but less awareness of TIA. Non-English speakers may be less aware of ‘Act FAST’.",
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N2 - Background Rapid medical assessment and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke significantly reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. Previous research has shown that delays to initial medical assessment are due to lack of an urgent response to symptoms. In comparison to other communities living within the UK, South Asians have a higher risk of stroke/TIA. Therefore, it is critically important to explore stroke/TIA knowledge and anticipated response to symptoms, within this community.Aim This study aims to provide preliminary evidence of stroke knowledge and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign in the South Asian community and to provide evidence of successful participant recruitment from ‘hard to engage’ groups.Method A pilot mixed methods study, incorporating focus group discussions and a short ‘tick box’ style paper survey, designed to assess and explore participant knowledge of stroke/TIA symptoms, and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign. Barriers and facilitators to stroke education and the suitability of mass-media campaigns are also discussed during the focus groups. All participants were recruited from places of worship.Results The authors will present highlights from the ‘on-going’ study including; the recruitment strategy, barriers and facilitators to recruitment in Sikh temples and preliminary findings from 68 completed surveys. Highlights from the focus group discussions will be presented, alongside participant suggested methods to improve stroke/TIA knowledge in Indian communities.Conclusion Preliminary findings suggest awareness of stroke symptoms in the Indian community, but less awareness of TIA. Non-English speakers may be less aware of ‘Act FAST’.

AB - Background Rapid medical assessment and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke significantly reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. Previous research has shown that delays to initial medical assessment are due to lack of an urgent response to symptoms. In comparison to other communities living within the UK, South Asians have a higher risk of stroke/TIA. Therefore, it is critically important to explore stroke/TIA knowledge and anticipated response to symptoms, within this community.Aim This study aims to provide preliminary evidence of stroke knowledge and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign in the South Asian community and to provide evidence of successful participant recruitment from ‘hard to engage’ groups.Method A pilot mixed methods study, incorporating focus group discussions and a short ‘tick box’ style paper survey, designed to assess and explore participant knowledge of stroke/TIA symptoms, and awareness of the relaunched ‘Act FAST’ campaign. Barriers and facilitators to stroke education and the suitability of mass-media campaigns are also discussed during the focus groups. All participants were recruited from places of worship.Results The authors will present highlights from the ‘on-going’ study including; the recruitment strategy, barriers and facilitators to recruitment in Sikh temples and preliminary findings from 68 completed surveys. Highlights from the focus group discussions will be presented, alongside participant suggested methods to improve stroke/TIA knowledge in Indian communities.Conclusion Preliminary findings suggest awareness of stroke symptoms in the Indian community, but less awareness of TIA. Non-English speakers may be less aware of ‘Act FAST’.

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