Dietary total antioxidant capacity and risk of ulcerative colitis: a case–control study

Jamal Rahmani, Hamed Kord-Varkaneh, Paul Ryan, Cain Clark, Andrew S Day, Azita Hekmatdoost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Data on the association between the antioxidant capacity of a diet and the risk of ulcerative colitis (UC) are scarce. This study aimed to assess whether a relationship exists between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the odds of UC in Iranian adults. Methods: In this case-control study, patients with UC and age-matched healthy controls were recruited from a hospital clinic. All participants completed a validated 168-item food frequency questionnaire, the results of which were subsequently used to generate dietary TAC. Ferric reducing-antioxidant power values were used to calculate dietary TAC. Results: Altogether 62 patients with UC and 124 healthy controls were enrolled. UC patients had a higher calorific intake (P < 0.01), and consumed more monounsaturated fatty acids (P < 0.01), vitamin B 9 (P < 0.01) and calcium (P = 0.02) compared with healthy controls, while the control group had a higher vitamin C intake than the participants with UC (P < 0.01). In a fully adjusted model, participants who were in the highest quartile of dietary TAC had a lower risk of UC (odds ratio 0.11, 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.73). Conclusions: A higher dietary TAC score was associated with lower odds of UC in this case-control study. Further elucidation of the role of key dietary elements is now warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)636-641
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Digestive Diseases
Volume20
Issue number12
Early online date30 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

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Ulcerative Colitis
Antioxidants
Case-Control Studies
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Vitamin B Complex
Ascorbic Acid
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Calcium
Food
Control Groups

Keywords

  • dietary total antioxidant capacity
  • ulcerative colitis
  • TAC
  • diet

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Dietary total antioxidant capacity and risk of ulcerative colitis : a case–control study. / Rahmani, Jamal; Kord-Varkaneh, Hamed; Ryan, Paul; Clark, Cain; Day, Andrew S; Hekmatdoost, Azita .

In: Journal of Digestive Diseases, Vol. 20, No. 12, 01.12.2019, p. 636-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahmani, Jamal ; Kord-Varkaneh, Hamed ; Ryan, Paul ; Clark, Cain ; Day, Andrew S ; Hekmatdoost, Azita . / Dietary total antioxidant capacity and risk of ulcerative colitis : a case–control study. In: Journal of Digestive Diseases. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 12. pp. 636-641.
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