Development and User Satisfaction of “Plan-It Commander,” a Serious Game for Children with ADHD

Kim Bul, Ingmar Franken, Saskia Van der Oord, Pamela M. Kato, Marina Danckaerts , Leonie Vreeke, Annik Willems, Helga van Oers, Ria van den Heuvel, Rens van Slagmaat, Athanasios Maras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)
94 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The need for engaging treatment approaches within mental health care has led to the application of gaming approaches to existing behavioral training programs (i.e., gamification). Because children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to have fewer problems with concentration and engagement when playing digital games, applying game technologies and design approaches to complement treatment may be a useful means to engage this population in their treatment. Unfortunately, gamified training programs currently available for ADHD have been limited in their ability to demonstrate in-game behavior skills that generalize to daily life situations. Therefore, we developed a new serious game (called “Plan-It Commander”) that was specifically designed to promote behavioral learning and promotes strategy use in domains of daily life functioning such as time management, planning/organizing, and prosocial skills that are known to be problematic for children with ADHD. An interdisciplinary team contributed to the development of the game. The game's content and approach are based on psychological principles from the Self-Regulation Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and Learning Theory. In this article, game development and the scientific background of the behavioral approach are described, as well as results of a survey (n = 42) to gather user feedback on the first prototype of the game. The findings suggest that participants were satisfied with this game and provided the basis for further development and research to the game. Implications for developing serious games and applying user feedback in game development are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502-512
Number of pages11
JournalGames for health journal
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Aug 2015

Fingerprint

ADHD
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Feedback
training program
behavioral training
Health care
Learning
Time Management
Education
cognitive learning
management planning
time management
Aptitude
cognitive theory
life situation
social learning
learning theory
self-regulation
Planning
research and development

Bibliographical note

Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2015.0021 .

Keywords

  • Development
  • Serious game
  • ADHD
  • Usability

Cite this

Bul, K., Franken, I., Van der Oord, S., Kato, P. M., Danckaerts , M., Vreeke, L., ... Maras, A. (2015). Development and User Satisfaction of “Plan-It Commander,” a Serious Game for Children with ADHD. Games for health journal, 4(6), 502-512. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2015.0021

Development and User Satisfaction of “Plan-It Commander,” a Serious Game for Children with ADHD. / Bul, Kim; Franken, Ingmar ; Van der Oord, Saskia ; Kato, Pamela M.; Danckaerts , Marina ; Vreeke, Leonie; Willems, Annik; van Oers, Helga ; van den Heuvel, Ria; van Slagmaat, Rens; Maras, Athanasios.

In: Games for health journal, Vol. 4, No. 6, 28.08.2015, p. 502-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bul, K, Franken, I, Van der Oord, S, Kato, PM, Danckaerts , M, Vreeke, L, Willems, A, van Oers, H, van den Heuvel, R, van Slagmaat, R & Maras, A 2015, 'Development and User Satisfaction of “Plan-It Commander,” a Serious Game for Children with ADHD' Games for health journal, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 502-512. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2015.0021
Bul, Kim ; Franken, Ingmar ; Van der Oord, Saskia ; Kato, Pamela M. ; Danckaerts , Marina ; Vreeke, Leonie ; Willems, Annik ; van Oers, Helga ; van den Heuvel, Ria ; van Slagmaat, Rens ; Maras, Athanasios. / Development and User Satisfaction of “Plan-It Commander,” a Serious Game for Children with ADHD. In: Games for health journal. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 502-512.
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