Determination of the yield loci of four sheet materials (AA6111-T4, AC600, DX54D+Z, and H220BD+Z) by using uniaxial tensile and hydraulic bulge tests

Hamzah Alharthi, Sumit Hazra, Abdulrahman Alghamdi, Dorel Banabic, Richard Dashwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In sheet metal forming simulation, a flow curve and a yield criterion are vital requirements for obtaining reliable numerical results. It is more appropriate to determine a flow curve by using biaxial stress condition tests, such as the hydraulic bulge test, than a uniaxial test because hardening proceeds higher strains before necking occurs. In a uniaxial test, higher strains are extrapolated, which might lead to incorrect results. The bulge test, coupled with the digital image correlation (DIC) system, is used to obtain stress–strain data. In the absence of the DIC system, analytical methods are used to estimate hardening. Typically, such models incorporate a correction factor to achieve correlation to experimental data. An example is the Chakrabarty and Alexander method, which uses a correction factor based on the n value. Here, the Chakrabarty and Alexander approach was modified using a correction factor based on normal anisotropy. When compared with DIC data, the modified model was found to be able to better predict the hardening curves for the materials examined in this study. Because a biaxial flow curve is required to compute the biaxial yield stress, which is an essential input to advanced yield functions, the effects of the various approaches used to determine the biaxial stress–strain data on the shape of the BBC2005 yield loci were also investigated. The proposed method can accurately predict the magnitude of the biaxial yield stress, when compared with DIC data, for all materials investigated in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1307–1319
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology
Volume98
Issue number5-8
Early online date19 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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Hardening
Hydraulics
Yield stress
Metal forming
Sheet metal
Anisotropy

Keywords

  • Biaxial flow curve
  • Bulge test
  • Normal anisotropy
  • Yield criterion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Software
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Determination of the yield loci of four sheet materials (AA6111-T4, AC600, DX54D+Z, and H220BD+Z) by using uniaxial tensile and hydraulic bulge tests. / Alharthi, Hamzah; Hazra, Sumit; Alghamdi, Abdulrahman; Banabic, Dorel; Dashwood, Richard.

In: International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Vol. 98, No. 5-8, 09.2018, p. 1307–1319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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