Dectin-1 is not required for controlling Candida albicans colonization of the gastrointestinal tract

Simon Vautier, Rebecca A. Drummond, Pierre Redelinghuys, Graeme I. Murray, Donna M. MacCallum, Gordon D. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Candida albicans is normally found as a commensal microbe, commonly colonizing the gastrointestinal tract in humans. However, this fungus can also cause mucosal and systemic infections once immune function is compromised. Dectin-1 is an innate pattern recognition receptor essential for the control of fungal infections in both mice and humans; however, its role in the control of C. albicans colonization of the gastrointestinal tract has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that in mice dectin-1 is essential for the control of gastrointestinal invasion during systemic infection, with dectin-1 deficiency associating with impaired fungal clearance and dysregulated cytokine production. Surprisingly, however, following oral infection, dectin-1 was not required for the control of mucosal colonization of the gastrointestinal tract, in terms of either fungal burdens or cytokine response. Thus, in mice, dectin-1 is essential for controlling systemic infection with C. albicans but appears to be redundant for the control of gastrointestinal colonization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4216-4222
Number of pages7
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume80
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Vautier, S., Drummond, R. A., Redelinghuys, P., Murray, G. I., MacCallum, D. M., & Brown, G. D. (2012). Dectin-1 is not required for controlling Candida albicans colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. Infection and Immunity, 80(12), 4216-4222. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00559-12