Dance's Political Imaginaries

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines claims made by choreographers and scholars about a particular type of political value. In relation to ideas arising in philosophical aesthetics about the distinction between inherent and instrumental value, and different forms of cognitivist value, I examine how claims made through the textual framing of performance about dance’s ability to challenge neoliberal capitalism create a paradox in which dance’s non-instrumental character is instrumentalised as politically useful. In response to this paradox, I go on to suggest that claims about dance’s political nature function as a form of ‘myth’ which gives rise to an ‘imaginary’ in which dance can oppose the structural forces within which it is produced, shared and consumed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationA World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances
PublisherC-DaRE
Pages87-111
Number of pages34
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Fingerprint

Dance
Paradox
Aesthetics
Choreographers
Instrumental Value
Cognitivist
Political Values
Capitalism
Nature

Cite this

Blades, H. (2018). Dance's Political Imaginaries. In A World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances (pp. 87-111). C-DaRE.

Dance's Political Imaginaries. / Blades, Hetty.

A World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances. C-DaRE, 2018. p. 87-111.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Blades, H 2018, Dance's Political Imaginaries. in A World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances. C-DaRE, pp. 87-111.
Blades H. Dance's Political Imaginaries. In A World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances. C-DaRE. 2018. p. 87-111
Blades, Hetty. / Dance's Political Imaginaries. A World of Muscle, Bone and Organ: Research and Scholarship in Dances. C-DaRE, 2018. pp. 87-111
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