Current International Security Sector Development (SSD) and its Implication for Developing Countries: ISSD and Developing Countries

Brian Ikejiaku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Has Development and Human Rights lobby lost out to the Defence lobby since after the 9/11? In this article, the author argues that the current international security sector development, which influences national security, shows neglect on human security and human development in developing countries. Crucially, since the strike on the World Trade Centre in 9/11 2001, the global-security approach has changed. It is conspicuous now that the West decides to concentrate and invest heavily militarily, rather than on socio-economic development. It is the assumption of the Western developed countries that they will gain little or virtually nothing in investing more on international development; but that they would gain more by investing militarily as a means to reducing the global threat to peace, security and stability. Using empirical data and illustrations from developing countries, especially Africa and approached from non-western perspectives. This paper attempts a 'critical analysis' on the current ISSD and proffers avenues on how to deal with these challenges, in order to improve human security and human development in developing countries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-172
Number of pages18
JournalSeton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations
Volume XVI
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2015

Fingerprint

security sector
international security
developing country
human security
lobby
strike
national security
world trade
neglect
peace
human rights
threat
economics

Keywords

  • International Relations
  • Security Sector Development
  • Human Security
  • Human Development
  • International Development
  • Hard Diplomacy
  • International Security

Cite this

@article{8ecfcfa347764169b62b3c584c4c81c5,
title = "Current International Security Sector Development (SSD) and its Implication for Developing Countries: ISSD and Developing Countries",
abstract = "Has Development and Human Rights lobby lost out to the Defence lobby since after the 9/11? In this article, the author argues that the current international security sector development, which influences national security, shows neglect on human security and human development in developing countries. Crucially, since the strike on the World Trade Centre in 9/11 2001, the global-security approach has changed. It is conspicuous now that the West decides to concentrate and invest heavily militarily, rather than on socio-economic development. It is the assumption of the Western developed countries that they will gain little or virtually nothing in investing more on international development; but that they would gain more by investing militarily as a means to reducing the global threat to peace, security and stability. Using empirical data and illustrations from developing countries, especially Africa and approached from non-western perspectives. This paper attempts a 'critical analysis' on the current ISSD and proffers avenues on how to deal with these challenges, in order to improve human security and human development in developing countries.",
keywords = "International Relations, Security Sector Development, Human Security, Human Development, International Development, Hard Diplomacy, International Security",
author = "Brian Ikejiaku",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "25",
language = "English",
volume = "XVI",
pages = "155--172",
journal = "Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Current International Security Sector Development (SSD) and its Implication for Developing Countries

T2 - ISSD and Developing Countries

AU - Ikejiaku, Brian

PY - 2015/2/25

Y1 - 2015/2/25

N2 - Has Development and Human Rights lobby lost out to the Defence lobby since after the 9/11? In this article, the author argues that the current international security sector development, which influences national security, shows neglect on human security and human development in developing countries. Crucially, since the strike on the World Trade Centre in 9/11 2001, the global-security approach has changed. It is conspicuous now that the West decides to concentrate and invest heavily militarily, rather than on socio-economic development. It is the assumption of the Western developed countries that they will gain little or virtually nothing in investing more on international development; but that they would gain more by investing militarily as a means to reducing the global threat to peace, security and stability. Using empirical data and illustrations from developing countries, especially Africa and approached from non-western perspectives. This paper attempts a 'critical analysis' on the current ISSD and proffers avenues on how to deal with these challenges, in order to improve human security and human development in developing countries.

AB - Has Development and Human Rights lobby lost out to the Defence lobby since after the 9/11? In this article, the author argues that the current international security sector development, which influences national security, shows neglect on human security and human development in developing countries. Crucially, since the strike on the World Trade Centre in 9/11 2001, the global-security approach has changed. It is conspicuous now that the West decides to concentrate and invest heavily militarily, rather than on socio-economic development. It is the assumption of the Western developed countries that they will gain little or virtually nothing in investing more on international development; but that they would gain more by investing militarily as a means to reducing the global threat to peace, security and stability. Using empirical data and illustrations from developing countries, especially Africa and approached from non-western perspectives. This paper attempts a 'critical analysis' on the current ISSD and proffers avenues on how to deal with these challenges, in order to improve human security and human development in developing countries.

KW - International Relations

KW - Security Sector Development

KW - Human Security

KW - Human Development

KW - International Development

KW - Hard Diplomacy

KW - International Security

M3 - Article

VL - XVI

SP - 155

EP - 172

JO - Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations

JF - Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations

IS - 1

ER -