Corporate social responsibility in South Africa: Quo Vadis?

David Alastair Lindsay Coldwell, Tasneem Joosub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – Strategies and policies aimed at alleviating poverty in Sub-Saharan African countries usually depend on capitalistically driven economic growth. However, the view that capitalism needs to reinvent itself to survive the crisis of confidence brought about by the recent global financial collapse depends on the extent to which such a shared value oriented, sustainable capitalist reinvention is embraced by emergent business leaders. A sustainable system of capitalism driven by business and community shared value can only take root if the hearts and minds of future business leaders are convinced of their cogency and appropriateness. The paper aims to discuss these issues.
Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings of an empirical study utilizing a Likert-type scale designed to measure corporate shared value (CSV) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) among a sample of fourth year accountancy students at a leading South African university.Findings– Preliminary findings suggest that perceptions of this group of emergent leaders generally regard CSR rather than CSV as the “correct” business model for companies to follow. Although the sample is limited to one South African university and is relatively small, it contributes to the literature by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take.
Research limitations/implications – Implications of the paper are that by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions of South African society and specifically their view of the direction South African CSR should take, the paper suggests prescriptive remedial steps in policy that educational and other learning institutions could take to engender appropriate social values in learners.
Originality/value – The study contributes to the literature by offering devised and tested measuring instruments for CSR and CSV in the South African context and gives insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)466-478
Number of pages13
JournalAfrican Journal of Economic and Management Studies
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Corporate Social Responsibility
South Africa
Shared values
Africa
Capitalism
Education
Confidence
Design methodology
Accountancy
Economic growth
African countries
Social values
Appropriateness
Business model
Measuring instruments
Empirical study
Poverty

Keywords

  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Capitalism
  • Corporate shared value

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Corporate social responsibility in South Africa : Quo Vadis? / Coldwell, David Alastair Lindsay; Joosub, Tasneem.

In: African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, Vol. 6, No. 4, 07.12.2015, p. 466-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coldwell, David Alastair Lindsay ; Joosub, Tasneem. / Corporate social responsibility in South Africa : Quo Vadis?. In: African Journal of Economic and Management Studies. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 466-478.
@article{b0fbbad576fa4c85b6a447198b984e11,
title = "Corporate social responsibility in South Africa: Quo Vadis?",
abstract = "Purpose – Strategies and policies aimed at alleviating poverty in Sub-Saharan African countries usually depend on capitalistically driven economic growth. However, the view that capitalism needs to reinvent itself to survive the crisis of confidence brought about by the recent global financial collapse depends on the extent to which such a shared value oriented, sustainable capitalist reinvention is embraced by emergent business leaders. A sustainable system of capitalism driven by business and community shared value can only take root if the hearts and minds of future business leaders are convinced of their cogency and appropriateness. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings of an empirical study utilizing a Likert-type scale designed to measure corporate shared value (CSV) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) among a sample of fourth year accountancy students at a leading South African university.Findings– Preliminary findings suggest that perceptions of this group of emergent leaders generally regard CSR rather than CSV as the “correct” business model for companies to follow. Although the sample is limited to one South African university and is relatively small, it contributes to the literature by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take.Research limitations/implications – Implications of the paper are that by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions of South African society and specifically their view of the direction South African CSR should take, the paper suggests prescriptive remedial steps in policy that educational and other learning institutions could take to engender appropriate social values in learners.Originality/value – The study contributes to the literature by offering devised and tested measuring instruments for CSR and CSV in the South African context and gives insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take",
keywords = "Corporate social responsibility, Capitalism, Corporate shared value",
author = "Coldwell, {David Alastair Lindsay} and Tasneem Joosub",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1108/AJEMS-11-2013-0102",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "466--478",
journal = "African Journal of Economic and Management Studies",
issn = "2040-0705",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Corporate social responsibility in South Africa

T2 - Quo Vadis?

AU - Coldwell, David Alastair Lindsay

AU - Joosub, Tasneem

PY - 2015/12/7

Y1 - 2015/12/7

N2 - Purpose – Strategies and policies aimed at alleviating poverty in Sub-Saharan African countries usually depend on capitalistically driven economic growth. However, the view that capitalism needs to reinvent itself to survive the crisis of confidence brought about by the recent global financial collapse depends on the extent to which such a shared value oriented, sustainable capitalist reinvention is embraced by emergent business leaders. A sustainable system of capitalism driven by business and community shared value can only take root if the hearts and minds of future business leaders are convinced of their cogency and appropriateness. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings of an empirical study utilizing a Likert-type scale designed to measure corporate shared value (CSV) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) among a sample of fourth year accountancy students at a leading South African university.Findings– Preliminary findings suggest that perceptions of this group of emergent leaders generally regard CSR rather than CSV as the “correct” business model for companies to follow. Although the sample is limited to one South African university and is relatively small, it contributes to the literature by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take.Research limitations/implications – Implications of the paper are that by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions of South African society and specifically their view of the direction South African CSR should take, the paper suggests prescriptive remedial steps in policy that educational and other learning institutions could take to engender appropriate social values in learners.Originality/value – The study contributes to the literature by offering devised and tested measuring instruments for CSR and CSV in the South African context and gives insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take

AB - Purpose – Strategies and policies aimed at alleviating poverty in Sub-Saharan African countries usually depend on capitalistically driven economic growth. However, the view that capitalism needs to reinvent itself to survive the crisis of confidence brought about by the recent global financial collapse depends on the extent to which such a shared value oriented, sustainable capitalist reinvention is embraced by emergent business leaders. A sustainable system of capitalism driven by business and community shared value can only take root if the hearts and minds of future business leaders are convinced of their cogency and appropriateness. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings of an empirical study utilizing a Likert-type scale designed to measure corporate shared value (CSV) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) among a sample of fourth year accountancy students at a leading South African university.Findings– Preliminary findings suggest that perceptions of this group of emergent leaders generally regard CSR rather than CSV as the “correct” business model for companies to follow. Although the sample is limited to one South African university and is relatively small, it contributes to the literature by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take.Research limitations/implications – Implications of the paper are that by offering insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions of South African society and specifically their view of the direction South African CSR should take, the paper suggests prescriptive remedial steps in policy that educational and other learning institutions could take to engender appropriate social values in learners.Originality/value – The study contributes to the literature by offering devised and tested measuring instruments for CSR and CSV in the South African context and gives insight into emergent business leaders’ perceptions and their view of the direction of CSR in South Africa should take

KW - Corporate social responsibility

KW - Capitalism

KW - Corporate shared value

U2 - 10.1108/AJEMS-11-2013-0102

DO - 10.1108/AJEMS-11-2013-0102

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 466

EP - 478

JO - African Journal of Economic and Management Studies

JF - African Journal of Economic and Management Studies

SN - 2040-0705

IS - 4

ER -