Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?

J. Begley, Frank Geary, Tom Stark

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    After the Famine, Irish wages caught up to those of Great Britain. Catch-up is ascribed to globalised labour markets and the effects of emigration. However current estimates of the level of Irish wages and their rate of growth are based on a small sample of the male workforce. This article presents estimates of the average wage for all wage earners and the Irish wage bill. This enables an estimate of an (implied) British average wage and wage bill. The new estimates show that although there was significant wage catch-up in a few occupations, in general catch-up was less rapid than recent studies have suggested. The origins of this catch-up are also examined. Consistent with earlier studies which emphasise modernisation of the post-Famine economy, the evidence of this article is consistent with the effects of traditional convergence forces such as TFP growth, capital accumulation and structural change operating alongside the effects of emigration.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-67
    JournalCambridge Journal of Economics
    Volume40
    Issue number1
    Early online date3 Dec 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

    Fingerprint

    Wages
    Ireland
    Catch-up
    Famine
    Emigration
    Capital accumulation
    Small sample
    Structural change
    Modernization
    TFP growth
    Labour market
    Workforce

    Bibliographical note

    This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cambridge Journal of Economics following peer review. The version of record Begley, J. , Geary, F. and Stark, T. (2014) Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?. Cambridge Journal of Economics, volume 40 (1): 43-67 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cje/beu063
    http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/1/43

    Keywords

    • Average wages
    • Wage bill
    • Catch-up
    • Emigration
    • Labour demand

    Cite this

    Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911? / Begley, J.; Geary, Frank; Stark, Tom.

    In: Cambridge Journal of Economics, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 43-67.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{715f2f0900c349c5b72a1dcd5500dd75,
    title = "Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?",
    abstract = "After the Famine, Irish wages caught up to those of Great Britain. Catch-up is ascribed to globalised labour markets and the effects of emigration. However current estimates of the level of Irish wages and their rate of growth are based on a small sample of the male workforce. This article presents estimates of the average wage for all wage earners and the Irish wage bill. This enables an estimate of an (implied) British average wage and wage bill. The new estimates show that although there was significant wage catch-up in a few occupations, in general catch-up was less rapid than recent studies have suggested. The origins of this catch-up are also examined. Consistent with earlier studies which emphasise modernisation of the post-Famine economy, the evidence of this article is consistent with the effects of traditional convergence forces such as TFP growth, capital accumulation and structural change operating alongside the effects of emigration.",
    keywords = "Average wages, Wage bill, Catch-up, Emigration, Labour demand",
    author = "J. Begley and Frank Geary and Tom Stark",
    note = "This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cambridge Journal of Economics following peer review. The version of record Begley, J. , Geary, F. and Stark, T. (2014) Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?. Cambridge Journal of Economics, volume 40 (1): 43-67 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cje/beu063 http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/1/43",
    year = "2016",
    month = "1",
    doi = "10.1093/cje/beu063",
    language = "English",
    volume = "40",
    pages = "43--67",
    journal = "Cambridge Journal of Economics",
    issn = "0309-166X",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?

    AU - Begley, J.

    AU - Geary, Frank

    AU - Stark, Tom

    N1 - This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cambridge Journal of Economics following peer review. The version of record Begley, J. , Geary, F. and Stark, T. (2014) Convergence in the pre-1914 Atlantic economy: what really happened to wages in Ireland between 1881 and 1911?. Cambridge Journal of Economics, volume 40 (1): 43-67 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cje/beu063 http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/1/43

    PY - 2016/1

    Y1 - 2016/1

    N2 - After the Famine, Irish wages caught up to those of Great Britain. Catch-up is ascribed to globalised labour markets and the effects of emigration. However current estimates of the level of Irish wages and their rate of growth are based on a small sample of the male workforce. This article presents estimates of the average wage for all wage earners and the Irish wage bill. This enables an estimate of an (implied) British average wage and wage bill. The new estimates show that although there was significant wage catch-up in a few occupations, in general catch-up was less rapid than recent studies have suggested. The origins of this catch-up are also examined. Consistent with earlier studies which emphasise modernisation of the post-Famine economy, the evidence of this article is consistent with the effects of traditional convergence forces such as TFP growth, capital accumulation and structural change operating alongside the effects of emigration.

    AB - After the Famine, Irish wages caught up to those of Great Britain. Catch-up is ascribed to globalised labour markets and the effects of emigration. However current estimates of the level of Irish wages and their rate of growth are based on a small sample of the male workforce. This article presents estimates of the average wage for all wage earners and the Irish wage bill. This enables an estimate of an (implied) British average wage and wage bill. The new estimates show that although there was significant wage catch-up in a few occupations, in general catch-up was less rapid than recent studies have suggested. The origins of this catch-up are also examined. Consistent with earlier studies which emphasise modernisation of the post-Famine economy, the evidence of this article is consistent with the effects of traditional convergence forces such as TFP growth, capital accumulation and structural change operating alongside the effects of emigration.

    KW - Average wages

    KW - Wage bill

    KW - Catch-up

    KW - Emigration

    KW - Labour demand

    U2 - 10.1093/cje/beu063

    DO - 10.1093/cje/beu063

    M3 - Article

    VL - 40

    SP - 43

    EP - 67

    JO - Cambridge Journal of Economics

    JF - Cambridge Journal of Economics

    SN - 0309-166X

    IS - 1

    ER -