Construction of next-generation superplastic forming using additive manufacturing and numerical techniques

Michal Mis, Richard Hall, Julian Spence, Nwabueze Emekwuru, Kevin Kibble, Mark Stanford, Fahd Banakhr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
172 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The superplastic forming process is used in a wide range of high-value-added manufacturing sectors to make lightweight, complex-shaped components for high-performance applications. Currently, it is a high-cost process, for example, the superplastic forming of titanium alloys involves a high-temperature furnace, costly (mould) tooling and has a high utilization of resources such as argon gas and energy. The authors of this article propose a prototype for next-generation superplastic forming laboratory equipment. The aim is to develop improved methods, particularly for heat management in the superplastic forming process, to allow a more widespread application of the process to manufacture lower cost products. The next-generation superplastic forming tool comprises a tool in the form of a hemispherical shell, pressure chamber with incorporated water cooling system and an infrared heating system. The construction, usability and suitability of the next-generation superplastic forming equipment have been proven by a series of physical experiments, and numerical simulations are performed and the results are presented and discussed in this article.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-165
Number of pages12
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture
Volume233
Issue number1
Early online date24 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

Fingerprint

3D printers
Infrared heating
Water cooling systems
Titanium alloys
Argon
Costs
Furnaces
Computer simulation
Gases

Bibliographical note

Copyright © Sage Publications

Keywords

  • experimental setup
  • heat management
  • model
  • optimization
  • process
  • radiation
  • simulation
  • Superplastic forming
  • Ti6-4

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Construction of next-generation superplastic forming using additive manufacturing and numerical techniques. / Mis, Michal; Hall, Richard; Spence, Julian; Emekwuru, Nwabueze; Kibble, Kevin; Stanford, Mark; Banakhr, Fahd.

In: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture, Vol. 233, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 154-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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