Coffee Ingestion Improves 5 km Cycling Performance in Men and Women by a Similar Magnitude

Neil Clarke, Nicholas Kirwan, Darren Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Caffeine is a well-established ergogenic aid, although research to date has predominantly focused on anhydrous caffeine, and in men. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of coffee ingestion on 5 km cycling time trial performance, and to establish whether sex differences exist. A total of 38 participants (19 men and 19 women) completed a 5 km time trial following the ingestion of 0.09 g·kg -1 coffee providing 3 mg·kg -1 of caffeine (COF), a placebo (PLA), in 300 mL of water, or control (CON). Coffee ingestion significantly increased salivary caffeine levels (p < 0.001; η 2 = 0.75) and, overall, resulted in improved 5 km time trial performance (p < 0.001; P η 2 = 0.23). Performance following COF (482 ± 51 s) was faster than PLA (491 ± 53 s; p = 0.002; P d = 0.17) and CON (487 ± 52 s; p =0.002; d = 0.10) trials, with men and women both improving by approximately 9 seconds and 6 seconds following coffee ingestion compared with placebo and control, respectively. However, no differences were observed between CON and PLA (p = 0.321; d = 0.08). In conclusion, ingesting coffee providing 3 mg·kg -1 of caffeine increased salivary caffeine levels and improved 5 km cycling time trial performance in men and women by a similar magnitude.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2575
Number of pages11
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2019

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Coffee
caffeine
Caffeine
Eating
ingestion
placebos
Placebos
ergogenic aids
gender differences
Sex Characteristics
Water
Research
water

Bibliographical note

This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Keywords

  • Afferent responses
  • Caffeine
  • Ergogenic aid
  • Sex differences
  • Time trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Coffee Ingestion Improves 5 km Cycling Performance in Men and Women by a Similar Magnitude. / Clarke, Neil; Kirwan, Nicholas; Richardson, Darren.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 11, 2575, 25.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clarke, Neil ; Kirwan, Nicholas ; Richardson, Darren. / Coffee Ingestion Improves 5 km Cycling Performance in Men and Women by a Similar Magnitude. In: Nutrients. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 11.
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