Circulating Inflammatory Markers May Mediate the Relationship between Healthy Plant-Based Diet and Metabolic Phenotype Obesity in Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

Azam Mohamadi, Farideh Shiraseb, Atieh Mirzababaei, Dorsa Hosseininasab, Niloufar Rasaei, Cain C. T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei

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6 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background. It has been posited that both metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) and metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUHO) could be emergent from diet and inflammatory markers. Thus, we sought to investigate the influence of plant-based diet on MHO and MUHO phenotypes mediated by inflammatory markers in overweight and obese women. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 289 women aged ≥18 years, with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2. Dietary intake was measured using 147 item food frequency questionnaire, as well as anthropometrics and biochemistry panel, in all participants. Metabolic health phenotypes were considered using Karelis score, while plant-based diet indices (PDI) were evaluated based on 18 food groups, where healthy and unhealthy PDI were identified. Results. Accordingly, 26.9% of women had MHO and 73.1% had MUHO phenotypes. After adjusting for potential confounders, TGF-β1 had a significant inverse association with hPDI (β: −0.28; 95% CI: 452.99, −85.25; P : 0.004). Moreover, we found that women with higher hPDI had lower odds of MUHO (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.39, 2.30; P : 0.03). Regarding the mediatory effect of the inflammatory markers, TGF-β1 ( P : 0.73), IL-β1 ( P : 0.14), and MCP1 ( P : 0.51) played a role in decreasing the odds of MUHO among hPDI tertiles. Conclusion. There was a significant inverse relationship between adherence to hPDI and MUHO phenotype in overweight and obese Iranian women. This association appeared to be mediated by TGF-β1, IL-β1, and MCP1.
Original languageEnglish
Article number8099382
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
Volume2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2022

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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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