China's fight against HIV/AIDS

Neil Gordon Renwick, Jing Gu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Officially, there were 650,000 people living with HIV in China in 2005.1 1. State Council AIDS Working Committee Office, UN Theme Group on HIV/AIDS in China and World Health Organization, 2005 Update on the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and Response in China (Beijing: National Center for AIDS/STD Prevention and Control, China CDC, 24 January 2006), p. 1; State Council AIDS Working Committee Office/UN Theme Group on HIV/AIDS in China, A Joint Assessment of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Care in China (2004) (Beijing: State Council AIDS Working Committee Office, 1 December 2004). View all notes The Chinese government has pledged to keep the total under 1.5 million by 2010. The study argues that China must emphasize non-epidemiological factors as mutually-reinforcing factors sustaining the disease. The fight is entwined with profound economic and social transition. Government and civil society have engaged with the principles and agencies of global HIV/AIDS governance. But HIV intersects with normative regimes addressing issues of humane governance in the widest socio-economic and political sense. Based upon primary and secondary research, the study reviews the evidence of the HIV/AIDS challenge facing China, considers the nature and quality of the national response, and evaluates the relationship of global and national regimes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)85-106
    JournalJournal of Contemporary China
    Volume17
    Issue number54
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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    acquired immune deficiency syndrome
    human immunodeficiency virus
    AIDS
    China
    UNO
    regime
    governance
    World Health Organization
    civil society
    WHO
    economics
    Group
    Disease

    Keywords

    • China
    • HIV
    • AIDS
    • disease control

    Cite this

    China's fight against HIV/AIDS. / Renwick, Neil Gordon; Gu, Jing.

    In: Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 17, No. 54, 2008, p. 85-106.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Renwick, Neil Gordon ; Gu, Jing. / China's fight against HIV/AIDS. In: Journal of Contemporary China. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 54. pp. 85-106.
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