Child First, Migrant Second: Ensuring that Every Child Matters

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

This report examines the impact of recent changes
in asylum and immigration law and practice on children subject to immigration control within the context of the Every Child Matters framework.
This is particularly important and necessary because of the lack of explicit sharing of Information across the two areas of policy and
practice. Many of those working in asylum and immigration law are unaware of the broader context of children’s law and policy that they can draw upon to ensure that these children are able to access the services and care to which they are entitled under the Children Act 1989 and Children Act 2004. At the same time, there is considerable confusion and misunderstanding across the social care profession about what recent changes to immigration policy and practice mean for the delivery of services and support to children
and young people who are subject to immigration control. Good practice is found in some social service departments (SSDs), particularly among some specialised teams working with separated
asylum seeking children. However recent developments, various legal challenges, as well as policy debates around whether the safeguarding provisions associated with the Children Act 2004 extend to children subject to immigration control have served only to increase confusion about the relationship between these two areas of policy and practice. Some social workers and other professionals assume that the provisions of the Children Act 1989 and Children Act 2004 do not apply to children subject to immigration control. This can result in a failure to deliver appropriate services and support.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherImmigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA)
Commissioning bodyImmigration Law Practitioners' Association
Number of pages93
ISBN (Print)1 901833 12 7
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Keywords

  • Children
  • Young People
  • Immigration controls
  • Immigration policy
  • Immigration
  • Public Policy
  • United Kingdom

Cite this

Crawley, H. (2006). Child First, Migrant Second: Ensuring that Every Child Matters. London: Immigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA).

Child First, Migrant Second : Ensuring that Every Child Matters. / Crawley, Heaven.

London : Immigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA), 2006. 93 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Crawley, H 2006, Child First, Migrant Second: Ensuring that Every Child Matters. Immigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA), London.
Crawley H. Child First, Migrant Second: Ensuring that Every Child Matters. London: Immigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA), 2006. 93 p.
Crawley, Heaven. / Child First, Migrant Second : Ensuring that Every Child Matters. London : Immigration Law Practitioners' Association (ILPA), 2006. 93 p.
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