Characterization of the human liver vasopressin receptor. Profound differences between human and rat vasopressin-receptor-mediated responses suggest only a minor role for vasopressin in regulating human hepatic function

J. Howl, T. Ismail, A. J. Strain, C. J. Kirk, D. Anderson, M. Wheatley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The [Arg8]vasopressin (AVP) receptor expressed by human hepatocytes was characterized, and compared with the rat hepatic V(1a) vasopressin receptor subtype. In addition to determining the pharmacological profile of the human receptor, the cellular responses to AVP were measured in human and rat hepatocytes by assaying glycogen phosphorylase a activity and DNA synthesis. Marked differences were observed between human and rat hepatocytes regarding vasopressin receptors and the intracellular consequences of stimulation by AVP. Data presented in this paper demonstrate the following. (i) Vasopressin V(1a) receptors are present in low abundance on human hepatocytes. (ii) Species differences exist between human and rat V(1a) receptors with respect to the affinity of some selective antagonists. (iii) AVP-stimulated glycogen phosphorylase a activation in human hepatocytes was approx. 5% of that observed in rat cells. (iv) In contrast with rat hepatocytes, DNA synthesis in human cells in culture was not stimulated by AVP. It is concluded that vasopressin plays only a minor role in the regulation of human hepatic function. Furthermore, conclusions drawn from observations made with AVp and its analogues on rat hepatic function cannot be directly extrapolated to the human situation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume276
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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