Carphone use and motorway driving

A. M. Parkes, S. H. Fairclough, M. C. Ashby

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

This study sought to identify changes in driver behaviour due to handsfree telephone conversations carried out during motorway driving. 18 volunteer subjects either drove in silence or whilst completing verbal tasks on a Carphone. No evidence for a change in driving behaviour in terms of speed choice, lane occupancy, accelerator use or overtaking manoeuvres was found. However mental workload did increase. The results are presented in relation to other studies, and safety implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008
Subtitle of host publicationSelected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages302-307
Number of pages6
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9780415804349
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

traffic behavior
Telephone
workload
Particle accelerators
telephone
conversation
driver
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Parkes, A. M., Fairclough, S. H., & Ashby, M. C. (2009). Carphone use and motorway driving. In Contemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008: Selected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference (1 ed., pp. 302-307). Taylor & Francis.

Carphone use and motorway driving. / Parkes, A. M.; Fairclough, S. H.; Ashby, M. C.

Contemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008: Selected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference. 1. ed. Taylor & Francis, 2009. p. 302-307.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Parkes, AM, Fairclough, SH & Ashby, MC 2009, Carphone use and motorway driving. in Contemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008: Selected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference. 1 edn, Taylor & Francis, pp. 302-307.
Parkes AM, Fairclough SH, Ashby MC. Carphone use and motorway driving. In Contemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008: Selected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference. 1 ed. Taylor & Francis. 2009. p. 302-307
Parkes, A. M. ; Fairclough, S. H. ; Ashby, M. C. / Carphone use and motorway driving. Contemporary Ergonomics 1984-2008: Selected Papers and an Overview of the Ergonomics Society Annual Conference. 1. ed. Taylor & Francis, 2009. pp. 302-307
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