‘Careers as voyages of self-discovery’: why men return to education

Adrian Hancock

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)
    87 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This article critically examines the career development of a number of male adult returners to further education and explores the factors that influenced their career decision-making. It also explores the specific reasons why these men returned to education and in so doing connects with the work of Scanlon. The paper argues that men's decision to return to education is best understood as the outcome of prior career development/learning. Although reference is made to a number of theories of career choice the main focus is Hodkinson and colleagues' careership theory.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)191-206
    JournalStudies in Continuing Education
    Volume34
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    career
    education
    further education
    decision making
    learning

    Bibliographical note

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Studies in Continuing Education, 34 (2), pp. 191-206. Studies in Continuing Education is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0158037X.2011.609164#.U43KXUpwaDY.

    Keywords

    • male
    • returners
    • education
    • careers

    Cite this

    ‘Careers as voyages of self-discovery’: why men return to education. / Hancock, Adrian.

    In: Studies in Continuing Education, Vol. 34, No. 2, 2012, p. 191-206.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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