Capturing whole person care [editorial]

A. Morris, D. Biggerstaff, Deborah Lycett

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

1 Citation (Scopus)
19 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Biochemical blood levels are one international renal outcome measure. These quantitative data (such as phosphate levels) reflect, in part, dietary intervention and compliance to medical regimens, for example dialysis prescriptions and phosphate binding medication. The numbers demonstrate intervention efficacy, the cornerstone of evidence-based practice (EBP) (Greenhalgh et al., 2014). However, such data misses opportunities to capture the quality of the whole care provided, something that really matters to patients.

Publisher statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Morris, A. , Biggerstaff, D. and Lycett, D. (2016) Capturing whole person care [editorial]. Journal of Renal Care, volume 42 (2): 71–72, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12158. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms)"
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71–72
JournalJournal of Renal Care
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Phosphates
Kidney
Quality of Health Care
Evidence-Based Practice
Prescriptions
Dialysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Bibliographical note

Due to the publisher's policy the full text of this item will not be available from the repository until 5th May 2017.
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Morris, A. , Biggerstaff, D. and Lycett, D. (2016) Capturing whole person care [editorial]. Journal of Renal Care, volume 42 (2): 71–72, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12158. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms)"

Keywords

  • whole person care
  • renal care

Cite this

Capturing whole person care [editorial]. / Morris, A.; Biggerstaff, D.; Lycett, Deborah.

In: Journal of Renal Care, Vol. 42, No. 2, 2016, p. 71–72.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Morris, A. ; Biggerstaff, D. ; Lycett, Deborah. / Capturing whole person care [editorial]. In: Journal of Renal Care. 2016 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 71–72.
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