Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects?

Georgia Kirtland, Nikki Holliday, Julia Carroll

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Objectives: To compare benefits of a creative research tool (Lego® building) to a traditional social science method (focus group), when engaging inter-generational participants (parents and children) as contributors in the development of technology to support the health/well-being of older people.

Design: The mixed-methods study design collected qualitative and quantitative data to compare two different methodologies which may be used in the development of technologies to support the health and wellbeing of older people.

Methods: Seventy-five participants were recruited through an event called Coventry Young Researchers. Parents provided consent for themselves and their children. The sessions alternated between the two methods throughout the week. Data was transcribed, and then analysed using thematic analysis, with questionnaire data being summarised using descriptive statistics.

Results: There was no variance in innovativeness of designs, or richness of data between sessions, with both developing equally creative ideas that covered similar themes with regarding older people’s health and wellbeing (inclusiveness, travel, social, artificial intelligence, healthy lifestyles). Participants reported
enjoying the Lego® building session more, and were better engaged, being more likely to make a design contribution in the Lego® building condition.

Conclusions: Although in both the Lego® and focus group settings participants were able to produce innovative ideas regarding the development of technologies to support older people, the inclusion of a creative research tool, such as Lego® makes participating easier for children and parents, and encourages all participants to
have a design contribution, not just those brave enough to speak up in front of their peers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages68
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2 May 2019
EventBritish Psychological Society Annual Conference - Harrogate Convention Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 May 20192 May 2019

Conference

ConferenceBritish Psychological Society Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHarrogate
Period1/05/192/05/19

Fingerprint

research project
inclusion
parents
health
artificial intelligence
descriptive statistics
Group
social science
well-being
travel
questionnaire
event
methodology

Cite this

Kirtland, G., Holliday, N., & Carroll, J. (2019). Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects?. 68. Poster session presented at British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate, United Kingdom.

Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects? / Kirtland, Georgia ; Holliday, Nikki; Carroll, Julia.

2019. 68 Poster session presented at British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Kirtland, G, Holliday, N & Carroll, J 2019, 'Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects?' British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate, United Kingdom, 1/05/19 - 2/05/19, pp. 68.
Kirtland G, Holliday N, Carroll J. Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects?. 2019. Poster session presented at British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate, United Kingdom.
Kirtland, Georgia ; Holliday, Nikki ; Carroll, Julia. / Can the Benefits of Creative Methods Support the Inclusion of Children as part of Intergenerational Research Projects?. Poster session presented at British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate, United Kingdom.1 p.
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AB - Objectives: To compare benefits of a creative research tool (Lego® building) to a traditional social science method (focus group), when engaging inter-generational participants (parents and children) as contributors in the development of technology to support the health/well-being of older people.Design: The mixed-methods study design collected qualitative and quantitative data to compare two different methodologies which may be used in the development of technologies to support the health and wellbeing of older people.Methods: Seventy-five participants were recruited through an event called Coventry Young Researchers. Parents provided consent for themselves and their children. The sessions alternated between the two methods throughout the week. Data was transcribed, and then analysed using thematic analysis, with questionnaire data being summarised using descriptive statistics.Results: There was no variance in innovativeness of designs, or richness of data between sessions, with both developing equally creative ideas that covered similar themes with regarding older people’s health and wellbeing (inclusiveness, travel, social, artificial intelligence, healthy lifestyles). Participants reportedenjoying the Lego® building session more, and were better engaged, being more likely to make a design contribution in the Lego® building condition.Conclusions: Although in both the Lego® and focus group settings participants were able to produce innovative ideas regarding the development of technologies to support older people, the inclusion of a creative research tool, such as Lego® makes participating easier for children and parents, and encourages all participants tohave a design contribution, not just those brave enough to speak up in front of their peers.

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