Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe?

Ulrich Schmutz, Chris Firth, Francis Rayns, Clive Rahn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Most fresh organic vegetables are produced in intensive rotations, which rely heavily on large inputs of nitrogen to maintain the yield and quality of produce demanded by
customers. Field vegetable crops often use nitrogen inefficiently and may leave large
residues of nitrogen in the soil after harvest, which can lead to damage to soil, water and air quality. The four-year project EU-ROTATE_N "Development of a model-based
decision support system to optimize nitrogen use in horticultural crops rotations across Europe" aims to reduce some of these problems. The project, led by HRI Wellesbourne, started in January 2003 and involves seven research organizations from countries in northern, central and southern Europe. Work includes the evaluation of the effects of varying levels of N supply on both product quality and farm income for organic and conventional rotations, as well as case studies for the evaluation of agricultural strategies with respect to N losses and economics for vegetable crops in Europe. This paper describes the work carried out at HDRA which focuses on farm economics and organic field vegetable rotations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOrganic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004
EditorsA Hopkins
PublisherBritish Grassland Society (BGS)
Pages200-203
Number of pages4
Volume37
ISBN (Print)9780905944845
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004
EventBritish Grassland Society/Association of Applied Biologists/ Colloquium of Organic Researchers Conference: Organic farming : science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping - Harper Adams University College, Newport, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Apr 200422 Apr 2004

Publication series

NameBGS Occasional Symposium Series
Volume37
ISSN (Print)0572-7022

Conference

ConferenceBritish Grassland Society/Association of Applied Biologists/ Colloquium of Organic Researchers Conference
Abbreviated titleBGS/AAB/COR Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityNewport
Period20/04/0422/04/04

Fingerprint

farm income
vegetables
nitrogen
vegetable crops
economics
research institutions
support systems
air quality
soil air
Southern European region
horticultural crops
Northern European region
field crops
Central European region
product quality
soil quality
water quality
soil water
case studies
farms

Cite this

Schmutz, U., Firth, C., Rayns, F., & Rahn, C. (2004). Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe? In A. Hopkins (Ed.), Organic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004: proceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004 (Vol. 37, pp. 200-203). (BGS Occasional Symposium Series; Vol. 37). British Grassland Society (BGS).

Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe? / Schmutz, Ulrich; Firth, Chris; Rayns, Francis; Rahn, Clive.

Organic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004: proceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004. ed. / A Hopkins. Vol. 37 British Grassland Society (BGS), 2004. p. 200-203 (BGS Occasional Symposium Series; Vol. 37).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Schmutz, U, Firth, C, Rayns, F & Rahn, C 2004, Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe? in A Hopkins (ed.), Organic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004: proceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004. vol. 37, BGS Occasional Symposium Series, vol. 37, British Grassland Society (BGS), pp. 200-203, British Grassland Society/Association of Applied Biologists/ Colloquium of Organic Researchers Conference, Newport, United Kingdom, 20/04/04.
Schmutz U, Firth C, Rayns F, Rahn C. Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe? In Hopkins A, editor, Organic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004: proceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004. Vol. 37. British Grassland Society (BGS). 2004. p. 200-203. (BGS Occasional Symposium Series).
Schmutz, Ulrich ; Firth, Chris ; Rayns, Francis ; Rahn, Clive. / Can N Use and Farm Income be Optimized for Organic Field Vegetable Rotations in Europe?. Organic Farming: Science and practice for profitable livestock and cropping, on 20-22 April 2004: proceedings of the BGS/AAB/COR Conference held at the Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, UK 20-22 April 2004. editor / A Hopkins. Vol. 37 British Grassland Society (BGS), 2004. pp. 200-203 (BGS Occasional Symposium Series).
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