Can customer relationships backfire? How relationship norms shape moral obligation in cancelation behavior

Saleh Shuqair, Diego Costa Pinto, Frederico Cruz de Jesus , Anna Mattila , Patricia da Fonseca Guerreiro, Kevin Kam Fung So

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Abstract

While prior research indicates that establishing interpersonal interaction with customers is mostly beneficial, this work reveals that the impact of social ties depends on relationship norms (communal vs. exchange). In three studies, including a real-world field dataset ( N = 87,615 customers), the current investigation demonstrates the conditions under which interpersonal relationships can increase or decrease customers’ cancelation behaviour. The findings indicate that communal (vs. exchange) relationships can increase customers’ future cancelation behaviours. The findings also demonstrate that perceived moral obligation underlies interpersonal effects on cancelation behaviour. That is, when providers develop communal (vs. exchange) ties,consumers feel that their interaction with the providers is in a closed social context, which tends to reduce their obligations towards attending their booking, thus increasing cancelation behaviour. Theoretical and practical implications for business researchers and practitioners are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-472
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume151
Issue numberNovember 2022
Early online date18 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article under the CC-BY license

Keywords

  • Cancelation behavior
  • Communal relationships
  • Exchange relationship

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