Buying Friends? The Importance of Economic Flows in Assembling the Iraq War Coalition

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Abstract

Economic ties between countries are likely to influence the alignment of their international policies. This paper investigates whether countries historical economic ties with the United States and their expectation of changes in future economic flows had a role in their decision to join the US-led coalition in Iraq from 2003 onwards. We use data on 115 countries over the period 2003-2009 to estimate panel random effects probit models of war coalition participation. We measure the intensity of economic ties with three variables: bilateral trade flows between the partner country and the US as well as FDI and aid flows from the US to the partner country. Our results suggest that both good trade relations prior to the conflict and the prospects of their further improvements increase the willingness of countries to join the coalition. In spite of the anecdotal evidence, we find no empirical evidence that the dependence on American FDI or aid affected countries decision on Iraq war participation.
Original languageEnglish
Article number20170031
JournalPeace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy
Volume23
Issue number4
Early online date15 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2017

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Iraq
coalition
economics
aid flow
trade relations
trade flow
trade relation
participation
evidence
aid
Iraq war
Economics
decision
Participation
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Keywords

  • Aid
  • Economic ties
  • FDI
  • Trade
  • War coalitions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Buying Friends? The Importance of Economic Flows in Assembling the Iraq War Coalition. / Riegler, Robert; Lis, Piotr; Hisarciklilar, Mehtap.

In: Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, Vol. 23, No. 4, 20170031, 20.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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