Bridging the second gap in translation: A case study of barriers and facilitators to implementing Patient-initiated Clinics into secondary care

Eline Kieft, Jo Day, Richard Byng, Paul McArdle, Victoria A. Goodwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rationale: Patient-initiated clinics (PIC) have been found to be safe and have patient and service benefits in terms of satisfaction and cost. This paper reports our experiences of implementing PIC and the practical challenges of translating research into practice. Methods: The Knowledge to Action framework was used to inform the design of implementation plans in three different departments in one secondary health care organisation. A focused ethnographic approach was utilised to collect data on barriers and facilitators to implementation which were analysed using iterative qualitative analytic techniques. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework was used to develop the analysis and data presentation. Results: The success of implementation was mixed across the three departments. Despite evidence of effectiveness, contextual issues at a department level, such as empowered leadership and team members, trust in colleagues and patients and capacity to make changes, impacted on the progress of implementation. Discussion: Patient Initiated Clinics can offer a useful and feasible alternative for follow-up care of some groups of patients with long-term conditions in secondary care, and can be implemented through strong leadership and teamwork and a positive attitude to change. Although Implementation Science as an emerging field offers useful tools and theoretical support, its complexity may create additional challenges to implementation of specific interventions, and so further contribute to the second gap in translation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-137
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal for Person Centered Healthcare
Volume5
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Secondary Care
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Health Services Research
Health Services
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Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
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Bibliographical note

This paper has been published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare

Keywords

  • Implementation
  • Focused ethnography
  • Barriers and Facilitators
  • PARiHS Framework
  • Knowledge to Action Framework
  • Patient-initiated Clinics

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Bridging the second gap in translation : A case study of barriers and facilitators to implementing Patient-initiated Clinics into secondary care. / Kieft, Eline; Day, Jo; Byng, Richard; McArdle, Paul; Goodwin, Victoria A.

In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, p. 129-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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