Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being

I. Krastev, L. Sage, J. Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

This study examined prefrontal brain asymmetry and basic needs as predictors of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Hypotheses predicted that eudaimonic and hedonic well-being would be positively predicted by left prefrontal dominance and higher levels of basic need satisfaction. Methods & Design: An opportunity sample of students (N = 64; M age = 21.17, SD = 3.65; males n = 32, females n = 32) completed self-report measures of basic need satisfaction, hedonic, and eudaimonic well-being, and underwent baseline recordings of electroencephalography (EEG). A combination of methods was used to further investigations on links between neural factors and cognitive variables of need satisfaction and well-being. Results: Regression analyses revealed hedonic well-being was weakly predicted by right side dominance in frontocentral EEG activity and weak to moderately predicted by basic need satisfaction. Eudaimonic well-being was weakly predicted by right side dominance in frontocentral EEG activity and moderate to strongly predicted by basic need satisfaction. The EEG and basic needs displayed unique effects on well-being with the basic needs showing a greater influence. Conclusions: Reported satisfaction of the basic needs of competence, autonomy and relatedness show a greater influence on hedonic and particularly eudaimonic well-being compared to links with right side dominant prefrontal EEG activity. Links with brain asymmetry did not follow the expected direction and whilst links with well-being were weak relative to basic needs, more research is required to substantiate the nature and reliability of the relationship between neural factors and well-being.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventBritish Psychological Society Psychobiology Section Annual Conference - Low Wood Bay Hotel, Windemere, United Kingdom
Duration: 2 Sep 20154 Sep 2015

Conference

ConferenceBritish Psychological Society Psychobiology Section Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
City Windemere
Period2/09/154/09/15

Fingerprint

Pleasure
Electroencephalography
Brain
Mental Competency
Self Report
Regression Analysis
Students
Research

Bibliographical note

This paper was given at the 'Psychobiology Section Annual Scientific Meeting 2015' held in 2-4 September 2015 at Low Wood Bay Hotel. Windermere: The British Psychological Society

Cite this

Krastev, I., Sage, L., & Williams, J. (2015). Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being. In Unknown Host Publication

Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being. / Krastev, I.; Sage, L.; Williams, J.

Unknown Host Publication. 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Krastev, I, Sage, L & Williams, J 2015, Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being. in Unknown Host Publication. British Psychological Society Psychobiology Section Annual Conference, Windemere, United Kingdom, 2/09/15.
Krastev I, Sage L, Williams J. Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being. In Unknown Host Publication. 2015
Krastev, I. ; Sage, L. ; Williams, J. / Brain Asymmetry and Basic Needs As Predictors of Hedonic and Eudaimonic Well-Being. Unknown Host Publication. 2015.
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