Book Review: Rape loot pillage: the political economy of sexual violence in armed conflict. By Sara Meger. New York: Oxford University Press

Sahla Aroussi

    Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article reviewpeer-review

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    Abstract

    In Rape loot pillage, Sara Meger offers a feminist political economy perspective on sexual violence in conflict. Meger's book is skilfully written and very well argued. Although other feminist scholars have also discussed securitization, Meger's analysis goes deeper, by drawing on the Marxist concept of ‘commodity fetishism’ to explain the ‘“fetishization” of sexual violence in international relations’ (p. 17). Meger argues that ‘fetishization’ has created a political economy of conflict-related sexual violence, in which ‘rape as a weapon of war’ becomes simply a commodity for consumption.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)200-201
    Number of pages2
    JournalInternational Affairs
    Volume94
    Issue number1
    Early online date18 Oct 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

    Bibliographical note

    Rape loot pillage: the political economy of sexual violence in armed conflict. By Sara Meger. New York: Oxford University Press. 2016. 248pp. £48.77. ISBN978 0 19027 766 6. Available as e-book.

    This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in International Affairs following peer review. The version of record Aroussi, S 2018, 'Book Review: Rape loot pillage: the political economy of sexual violence in armed conflict. By Sara Meger. New York: Oxford University Press' International Affairs, vol 94, no. 1, pp. 200-201 is available online at: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ia/iix225

    Keywords

    • rape
    • Congo
    • rape as a weapon of war
    • Conflict

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