Body Mass Index and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of over a million participants

Jamal Rahmani, Hamed Kord Varkaneh, Azita Hekmatdoost, Jacqueline Thomps, Cain Clark, Ammar Salehisahlabadi, Andrew S Day, Kevan Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is controversial. We performed a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate the association between BMI and risk of incident ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) using prospective cohort studies. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases from inception to January 2019. DerSimonian and Laird Random-effects model was used to estimate combined hazard ratios (HRs). Overall, 882 articles were screened and 42 full text articles were reviewed for inclusion using the study eligibility criteria. Five studies evaluated the association between BMI and IBD with 1,044,517 participants. Pooled results showed a significant association between obesity and risk of CD (HR: 1.42,95% CI: 1.18-1.71, I2:0.00). There was a significant non-linear association between BMI and risk of CD (p=0.01, Coeff=0.5024). Pooled results didn’t show any significant association between being underweight and risk of UC (HR: 1.07,95% CI:0.96-1.19, I2:0.00) or CD (HR:1.11,95% CI:0.93-1.31, I2:12.8). There was no difference in the risk for UC among obese participants compared to participants with normal BMI category (HR: 0.96,95% CI:0.80-1.14, I2:8.0). This systematic review and meta-analysis identified significant dose-response relationship between obesity as a risk factor and incident CD.
LanguageEnglish
Pages(In-press)
JournalObesity Reviews
Volume(In-press)
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Crohn Disease
Meta-Analysis
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Ulcerative Colitis
Obesity
Thinness
PubMed
MEDLINE
Databases
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Body Mass Index
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Obesity

Cite this

Rahmani, J., Varkaneh, H. K., Hekmatdoost, A., Thomps, J., Clark, C., Salehisahlabadi, A., ... Jacobson, K. (Accepted/In press). Body Mass Index and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of over a million participants. Obesity Reviews, (In-press), (In-press).

Body Mass Index and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of over a million participants. / Rahmani, Jamal; Varkaneh, Hamed Kord ; Hekmatdoost, Azita ; Thomps, Jacqueline ; Clark, Cain; Salehisahlabadi, Ammar ; Day, Andrew S; Jacobson, Kevan .

In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. (In-press), 10.04.2019, p. (In-press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahmani, J, Varkaneh, HK, Hekmatdoost, A, Thomps, J, Clark, C, Salehisahlabadi, A, Day, AS & Jacobson, K 2019, 'Body Mass Index and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of over a million participants', Obesity Reviews, vol. (In-press), pp. (In-press).
Rahmani, Jamal ; Varkaneh, Hamed Kord ; Hekmatdoost, Azita ; Thomps, Jacqueline ; Clark, Cain ; Salehisahlabadi, Ammar ; Day, Andrew S ; Jacobson, Kevan . / Body Mass Index and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies of over a million participants. In: Obesity Reviews. 2019 ; Vol. (In-press). pp. (In-press).
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