Bodies, Rivers, Rocks and Trees: Meeting agentic materiality in contemporary outdoor dance practices

Paula Kramer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article challenges an understanding of contemporary dance practices in the natural environment as naïve and concerned only with ‘feeling good and close to nature’. Instead it argues for the capacity of some practices to engage with and change how we live in this world - as and with materiality. Drawing on new materialist and object-friendly strands of philosophy it argues for a decentralised human position in a word made of vibrant matter (Jane Bennett) and autonomous objects (Graham Harman), suggesting that these propositions out of political theory and philosophy offer a potent perspective on outdoor dancing. Vice versa it argues that these strands of thinking can well be illuminated and concretized through outdoor dance practices. The article specifically proposes to attend to the rootedness of perception, awareness and receptivity in the physicality and materiality of the body. It argues that this allows movers to work effectively in the natural world, without having to fully understand, control or ‘connect’ with it. An embodied and receptive awareness may invite a site, a thing, a tree, to rise as co-presences with a dancer, permitting for movement in collaboration with the non-human to emerge in a field of multiple agents, operating in relation as well as independently of each other. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)83-91
    JournalPerformance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts
    Volume17
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Rock
    Rivers
    Dance
    Materiality
    Dancing
    Philosophy
    Nonhuman
    Natural World
    Receptivity
    Manuscripts
    Materialist
    Nature
    Political philosophy
    Contemporary Dance
    Physicality
    Nave
    Dancers
    Political Theory

    Bibliographical note

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .

    Keywords

    • contemporary dance
    • outdoor dance

    Cite this

    Bodies, Rivers, Rocks and Trees: Meeting agentic materiality in contemporary outdoor dance practices. / Kramer, Paula.

    In: Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2012, p. 83-91.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{af3db641f6c24e4da234feeadadc611d,
    title = "Bodies, Rivers, Rocks and Trees: Meeting agentic materiality in contemporary outdoor dance practices",
    abstract = "This article challenges an understanding of contemporary dance practices in the natural environment as na{\"i}ve and concerned only with ‘feeling good and close to nature’. Instead it argues for the capacity of some practices to engage with and change how we live in this world - as and with materiality. Drawing on new materialist and object-friendly strands of philosophy it argues for a decentralised human position in a word made of vibrant matter (Jane Bennett) and autonomous objects (Graham Harman), suggesting that these propositions out of political theory and philosophy offer a potent perspective on outdoor dancing. Vice versa it argues that these strands of thinking can well be illuminated and concretized through outdoor dance practices. The article specifically proposes to attend to the rootedness of perception, awareness and receptivity in the physicality and materiality of the body. It argues that this allows movers to work effectively in the natural world, without having to fully understand, control or ‘connect’ with it. An embodied and receptive awareness may invite a site, a thing, a tree, to rise as co-presences with a dancer, permitting for movement in collaboration with the non-human to emerge in a field of multiple agents, operating in relation as well as independently of each other. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .",
    keywords = "contemporary dance, outdoor dance",
    author = "Paula Kramer",
    note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .",
    year = "2012",
    doi = "10.1080/13528165.2012.712316",
    language = "English",
    volume = "17",
    pages = "83--91",
    journal = "Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts",
    issn = "1352-8165",
    publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
    number = "4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Bodies, Rivers, Rocks and Trees: Meeting agentic materiality in contemporary outdoor dance practices

    AU - Kramer, Paula

    N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .

    PY - 2012

    Y1 - 2012

    N2 - This article challenges an understanding of contemporary dance practices in the natural environment as naïve and concerned only with ‘feeling good and close to nature’. Instead it argues for the capacity of some practices to engage with and change how we live in this world - as and with materiality. Drawing on new materialist and object-friendly strands of philosophy it argues for a decentralised human position in a word made of vibrant matter (Jane Bennett) and autonomous objects (Graham Harman), suggesting that these propositions out of political theory and philosophy offer a potent perspective on outdoor dancing. Vice versa it argues that these strands of thinking can well be illuminated and concretized through outdoor dance practices. The article specifically proposes to attend to the rootedness of perception, awareness and receptivity in the physicality and materiality of the body. It argues that this allows movers to work effectively in the natural world, without having to fully understand, control or ‘connect’ with it. An embodied and receptive awareness may invite a site, a thing, a tree, to rise as co-presences with a dancer, permitting for movement in collaboration with the non-human to emerge in a field of multiple agents, operating in relation as well as independently of each other. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .

    AB - This article challenges an understanding of contemporary dance practices in the natural environment as naïve and concerned only with ‘feeling good and close to nature’. Instead it argues for the capacity of some practices to engage with and change how we live in this world - as and with materiality. Drawing on new materialist and object-friendly strands of philosophy it argues for a decentralised human position in a word made of vibrant matter (Jane Bennett) and autonomous objects (Graham Harman), suggesting that these propositions out of political theory and philosophy offer a potent perspective on outdoor dancing. Vice versa it argues that these strands of thinking can well be illuminated and concretized through outdoor dance practices. The article specifically proposes to attend to the rootedness of perception, awareness and receptivity in the physicality and materiality of the body. It argues that this allows movers to work effectively in the natural world, without having to fully understand, control or ‘connect’ with it. An embodied and receptive awareness may invite a site, a thing, a tree, to rise as co-presences with a dancer, permitting for movement in collaboration with the non-human to emerge in a field of multiple agents, operating in relation as well as independently of each other. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 16th August 2012, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13528165.2012.712316 .

    KW - contemporary dance

    KW - outdoor dance

    U2 - 10.1080/13528165.2012.712316

    DO - 10.1080/13528165.2012.712316

    M3 - Article

    VL - 17

    SP - 83

    EP - 91

    JO - Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts

    JF - Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts

    SN - 1352-8165

    IS - 4

    ER -