Beyond remain vs. leave: Understand changing voter perceptions and attitudes towards Populism - Evidence from Scotland and the West Midlands

Alex De Ruyter, David Hearne, Mansoob Murshed, Geoffrey Whittam, Dennis Aguma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the link between populism and governance arrangements. Adopting a comparative approach between the West Midlands and Scotland, it utilises novel primary qualitative data alongside official results and demographic statistics. Paying particular attention to the perspectives of Remain voters in “left behind” areas and how they perceive their Leave-voting counterparts, the article finds that despite divergent voting patterns both groups perceived a problematic lack of (regional) political agency. Economic disparities and subnational governance arrangements appear important in explaining discontent in those parts of the UK that have been “left behind” by globalisation. Meaningful devolution will be key in addressing these grievances.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-527
Number of pages21
JournalCambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
Volume14
Issue number3
Early online date26 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Cambridge Journal of Regions, following peer review. The version of record De Ruyter, A, Hearne, D, Murshed, M, Whittam, G & Aguma, D 2021, 'Beyond remain vs. leave: Understand changing voter perceptions and attitudes towards Populism - Evidence from Scotland and the West Midlands', Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 507-527 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsab019

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Brexit
  • devolution
  • governance
  • populism
  • spatial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

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