Barriers to access: factors limiting full participation of children with albinism at school in northern Malawi: Part 1

Patricia Lund, B. Massah, F. Mchekeni, P. Lynch

Abstract

Children with the inherited condition albinism in Africa lack pigment in their hair, eyes and skin and are an especially vulnerable group: they are ‘white’ in a black community, visually impaired, highly susceptible to sun-induced skin damage and suffer social stigma and rejection. The main aim of this study was to identify factors influencing access to and participation in education for young people with albinism in five rural villages in northern Malawi. An additional aim was to document local community beliefs about albinism which may impact on their educational opportunities and environment. This study, conducted in partnership with the Malawian Ministry of Education, the charities Malawi Council for the Handicapped (MACOHA) and The Albino Association of Malawi (TAAM), will have a high social impact by informing educational policy of this vulnerable group of children in Malawi. Publisher statement: This research was funded by a British Academy Small Research Grant to Coventry University.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationCoventry
PublisherCoventry University
StatePublished - 2015

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Malawi
child
measurement method
research
participation in education
handicapped
Ministry of Education
educational opportunity
Caucasian
educational policy
social effects
stigma
academy
grant
damages
village
statement
partnership
document
school

Keywords

  • Malawi
  • albinism
  • education

Cite this

Barriers to access: factors limiting full participation of children with albinism at school in northern Malawi: Part 1. / Lund, Patricia; Massah, B.; Mchekeni, F.; Lynch, P.

Coventry : Coventry University, 2015.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Lund, Patricia; Massah, B.; Mchekeni, F.; Lynch, P. / Barriers to access: factors limiting full participation of children with albinism at school in northern Malawi: Part 1.

Coventry : Coventry University, 2015.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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abstract = "Children with the inherited condition albinism in Africa lack pigment in their hair, eyes and skin and are an especially vulnerable group: they are ‘white’ in a black community, visually impaired, highly susceptible to sun-induced skin damage and suffer social stigma and rejection. The main aim of this study was to identify factors influencing access to and participation in education for young people with albinism in five rural villages in northern Malawi. An additional aim was to document local community beliefs about albinism which may impact on their educational opportunities and environment. This study, conducted in partnership with the Malawian Ministry of Education, the charities Malawi Council for the Handicapped (MACOHA) and The Albino Association of Malawi (TAAM), will have a high social impact by informing educational policy of this vulnerable group of children in Malawi. Publisher statement: This research was funded by a British Academy Small Research Grant to Coventry University.",
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