Barriers and motivators of physical activity participation in middle-aged and older adults—a systematic review

Karl Spiteri, David Broom, Amira Hassan Bekhet, John Xerri De Caro, Bob Laventure, Kate Grafton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying the difference in the barriers and motivators between middle-aged and older adults could contribute toward the development of age-specific health promotion interventions. The aim of this review was to synthesize the literature on the barriers and motivators for physical activity in middle-aged (50–64 years) and older (65–70 years) adults. This review examined qualitative and quantitative studies using the theoretical domain framework as the guiding theory. The search generated 9,400 results from seven databases, and 55 articles meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The results indicate that the barriers are comparable across the two age groups, with environmental factors and resources being the most commonly identified barriers. In older adults, social influences, reinforcement, and assistance in managing change were the most identified motivators. In middle-aged adults, goal-setting, the belief that an activity will be beneficial, and social influences were identified as the most important motivators. These findings can be used by professionals to encourage engagement with and adherence to physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)929-944
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Exercise
  • Theoretical domain framework

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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