Associations between long self-reported sleep, obesity and insulin resistance in a cohort of premenopausal Black and White South African women

Dale E Rae, Paula R Pienaar, Rob H P Henst, Laura C Roden, Julia H Goedecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: South African women have disproportionately high levels of overweight and obesity, and ethnic differences in obesity and insulin resistance have been observed. We investigated associations between self-reported sleep duration, obesity and insulin resistance in Black and White South African women.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

PARTICIPANTS: Black normal-weight (n = 122), Black obese (n = 133), White normal-weight (n = 87) and White obese (n = 63) urban South African women, aged 18 to 45y.

MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed questionnaires capturing self-reported sleep duration, demographic, socioeconomic, medical history and lifestyle information. Body composition and fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured.

RESULTS: The Black women reported longer sleep than the White women (median: 8 h, interquartile range: 8-10 h v 7(7-8) respectively, P < .001). Adjusted models indicated that women sleeping <7 h sleep were less likely to be obese (P = .035) or insulin resistant (P = .032), while those sleeping >9 h were more likely to be insulin resistant (P = .014) than those sleeping 7 to 9 h. Shorter self-reported sleep was associated with less insulin resistance (<7 h v 7-9 h: P = .018) and longer sleep with more insulin resistance (>9 h v 7-9 h: P = .047) in the Black but not White women.

CONCLUSIONS: Future research that objectively measures sleep duration is needed to confirm these observations and investigate potential factors contributing to the relationship between sleep and risk for non-communicable diseases in different ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)558-564
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Health
Volume4
Issue number6
Early online date2 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Insulin Resistance
Sleep
Obesity
Insulin
Weights and Measures
Body Composition
Ethnic Groups
Blood Glucose
hydroquinone
Life Style
Fasting
Demography

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2018 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • African Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data
  • Cohort Studies
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Insulin Resistance/ethnology
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity/ethnology
  • Premenopause
  • Risk
  • Self Report
  • Sleep
  • South Africa
  • Time Factors
  • Urban Population/statistics & numerical data
  • Young Adult

Cite this

Associations between long self-reported sleep, obesity and insulin resistance in a cohort of premenopausal Black and White South African women. / Rae, Dale E; Pienaar, Paula R; Henst, Rob H P; Roden, Laura C; Goedecke, Julia H.

In: Sleep Health, Vol. 4, No. 6, 12.2018, p. 558-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: South African women have disproportionately high levels of overweight and obesity, and ethnic differences in obesity and insulin resistance have been observed. We investigated associations between self-reported sleep duration, obesity and insulin resistance in Black and White South African women.DESIGN: Cross-sectional.PARTICIPANTS: Black normal-weight (n = 122), Black obese (n = 133), White normal-weight (n = 87) and White obese (n = 63) urban South African women, aged 18 to 45y.MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed questionnaires capturing self-reported sleep duration, demographic, socioeconomic, medical history and lifestyle information. Body composition and fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured.RESULTS: The Black women reported longer sleep than the White women (median: 8 h, interquartile range: 8-10 h v 7(7-8) respectively, P < .001). Adjusted models indicated that women sleeping <7 h sleep were less likely to be obese (P = .035) or insulin resistant (P = .032), while those sleeping >9 h were more likely to be insulin resistant (P = .014) than those sleeping 7 to 9 h. Shorter self-reported sleep was associated with less insulin resistance (<7 h v 7-9 h: P = .018) and longer sleep with more insulin resistance (>9 h v 7-9 h: P = .047) in the Black but not White women.CONCLUSIONS: Future research that objectively measures sleep duration is needed to confirm these observations and investigate potential factors contributing to the relationship between sleep and risk for non-communicable diseases in different ethnic groups.",
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author = "Rae, {Dale E} and Pienaar, {Paula R} and Henst, {Rob H P} and Roden, {Laura C} and Goedecke, {Julia H}",
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T1 - Associations between long self-reported sleep, obesity and insulin resistance in a cohort of premenopausal Black and White South African women

AU - Rae, Dale E

AU - Pienaar, Paula R

AU - Henst, Rob H P

AU - Roden, Laura C

AU - Goedecke, Julia H

N1 - Copyright © 2018 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - OBJECTIVES: South African women have disproportionately high levels of overweight and obesity, and ethnic differences in obesity and insulin resistance have been observed. We investigated associations between self-reported sleep duration, obesity and insulin resistance in Black and White South African women.DESIGN: Cross-sectional.PARTICIPANTS: Black normal-weight (n = 122), Black obese (n = 133), White normal-weight (n = 87) and White obese (n = 63) urban South African women, aged 18 to 45y.MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed questionnaires capturing self-reported sleep duration, demographic, socioeconomic, medical history and lifestyle information. Body composition and fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured.RESULTS: The Black women reported longer sleep than the White women (median: 8 h, interquartile range: 8-10 h v 7(7-8) respectively, P < .001). Adjusted models indicated that women sleeping <7 h sleep were less likely to be obese (P = .035) or insulin resistant (P = .032), while those sleeping >9 h were more likely to be insulin resistant (P = .014) than those sleeping 7 to 9 h. Shorter self-reported sleep was associated with less insulin resistance (<7 h v 7-9 h: P = .018) and longer sleep with more insulin resistance (>9 h v 7-9 h: P = .047) in the Black but not White women.CONCLUSIONS: Future research that objectively measures sleep duration is needed to confirm these observations and investigate potential factors contributing to the relationship between sleep and risk for non-communicable diseases in different ethnic groups.

AB - OBJECTIVES: South African women have disproportionately high levels of overweight and obesity, and ethnic differences in obesity and insulin resistance have been observed. We investigated associations between self-reported sleep duration, obesity and insulin resistance in Black and White South African women.DESIGN: Cross-sectional.PARTICIPANTS: Black normal-weight (n = 122), Black obese (n = 133), White normal-weight (n = 87) and White obese (n = 63) urban South African women, aged 18 to 45y.MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed questionnaires capturing self-reported sleep duration, demographic, socioeconomic, medical history and lifestyle information. Body composition and fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured.RESULTS: The Black women reported longer sleep than the White women (median: 8 h, interquartile range: 8-10 h v 7(7-8) respectively, P < .001). Adjusted models indicated that women sleeping <7 h sleep were less likely to be obese (P = .035) or insulin resistant (P = .032), while those sleeping >9 h were more likely to be insulin resistant (P = .014) than those sleeping 7 to 9 h. Shorter self-reported sleep was associated with less insulin resistance (<7 h v 7-9 h: P = .018) and longer sleep with more insulin resistance (>9 h v 7-9 h: P = .047) in the Black but not White women.CONCLUSIONS: Future research that objectively measures sleep duration is needed to confirm these observations and investigate potential factors contributing to the relationship between sleep and risk for non-communicable diseases in different ethnic groups.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - African Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Insulin Resistance/ethnology

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obesity/ethnology

KW - Premenopause

KW - Risk

KW - Self Report

KW - Sleep

KW - South Africa

KW - Time Factors

KW - Urban Population/statistics & numerical data

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.08.005

DO - 10.1016/j.sleh.2018.08.005

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 558

EP - 564

JO - Sleep Health

JF - Sleep Health

SN - 2352-7218

IS - 6

ER -