Associations between adherence to the MIND diet and prevalence of psychological disorders, and sleep disorders severity among obese and overweight women: A cross-sectional study

Atefeh Seifollahi, Lilit Sardari, Habib Yarizadeh, Atieh Mirzababaei, Farideh Shiraseb, Cain CT Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei

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    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background The effect of dietary patterns on sleep disorders and mental illness has previously been investigated. However, these studies have reported contradictory findings, and thus, the present study aimed to assess the association of the MIND diet on the sleep pattern and mental health in obese women. Methods This is a cross-sectional study in which 282 women, aged 18–56 years with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2.with no underlying diseases and malignancies, and participated. We used a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to collect participant's dietary intake. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) were used to measure the status of sleep disturbance and psychological disorders, including depression, anxiety, and stress respectively. Results A decreasing trend for psychological stress was observed in the highest quartiles of MIND diet score vs. the lowest quartiles (OR = 0.6 CI: 0.23–1.5 vs. 1.16 CI: 0.55–2.47). No significant difference was observed between severity of depression (OR = 0.87 95%, CI: 0.7–1.09, P = 0.23), anxiety (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.81–1.27, P = 0.86), stress (OR = 0.99 95%, CI: 0.79–1.23, P = 0.92), and MIND diet adherence in the crude and adjusted models. Conclusion The main finding from this study was that there is no significant association between adherence to the MIND diet and studied psychological disorders.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
    JournalNutrition and Health
    Volume(In-Press)
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Sept 2022

    Funder

    Funding Information: The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study was supported by the Tehran University of Medical Sciences and by grants from Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Grants ID: 97-03-161-41155).

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