Assessing older people's health: What contributions from social work?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The new community care arrangements have focused attention on assessment and on the responsibilities of health and social services. This article asks what contribution social workers can make to the assessment of older people’s health based on social science knowledge, to complement health professionals whose knowledge base centres on the natural sciences. A critical appraisal of recent evidence about health concepts, health choices, the social context of health experience, lay and alternative health work and social inequalities and health experience lead to the conclusion that health is as much a socially constructed phenomenon as biologically determined. Implications of the analysis for the content of health assessment are outlined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-42
Number of pages12
JournalPractice: Social Work in Action
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 1995

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social work
health
natural sciences
social inequality
health professionals
mobile social services
social worker
health service
experience
social science
responsibility
community
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Assessing older people's health : What contributions from social work? / Bywaters, Paul.

In: Practice: Social Work in Action, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.10.1995, p. 31-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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