Aspartame in conjunction with carbohydrate reduces insulin levels during endurance exercise

Jason Siegler, Keith Howell, Rebecca Vince, James Bray, Chris Towlson, Daniel Peart, Duane Mellor, Stephen Atkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As most sport drinks contain some form of non-nutritive sweetener (e.g. aspartame), and with the variation in blood glucose regulation and insulin secretion reportedly associated with aspartame, a further understanding of the effects on insulin and blood glucose regulation during exercise is warranted. Therefore, the aim of this preliminary study was to profile the insulin and blood glucose responses in healthy individuals after aspartame and carbohydrate ingestion during rest and exercise.
Findings: Each participant completed four trials under the same conditions (45 min rest + 60 min self-paced intense exercise) differing only in their fluid intake: 1) carbohydrate (2% maltodextrin and 5% sucrose (C)); 2) 0.04% aspartame with 2% maltodextrin and 5% sucrose (CA)); 3) water (W); and 4) aspartame (0.04% aspartame with 2% maltodextrin (A)). Insulin levels dropped significantly for CA versus C alone (43%) between pre-exercise and 30 min, while W and A insulin levels did not differ between these time points.
Conclusions: Aspartame with carbohydrate significantly lowered insulin levels during exercise versus carbohydrate alone.
Original languageEnglish
Article number36
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aspartame
aspartame
exercise
insulin
Carbohydrates
Insulin
carbohydrates
maltodextrins
blood glucose
Blood Glucose
Sucrose
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners
nonnutritive sweeteners
sucrose
insulin secretion
Sports
Eating
ingestion
Water

Keywords

  • Aspartame
  • Blood glucose
  • Exercise
  • Insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Aspartame in conjunction with carbohydrate reduces insulin levels during endurance exercise. / Siegler, Jason; Howell, Keith; Vince, Rebecca; Bray, James; Towlson, Chris; Peart, Daniel; Mellor, Duane; Atkin, Stephen.

In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, Vol. 9, 36, 01.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siegler, Jason ; Howell, Keith ; Vince, Rebecca ; Bray, James ; Towlson, Chris ; Peart, Daniel ; Mellor, Duane ; Atkin, Stephen. / Aspartame in conjunction with carbohydrate reduces insulin levels during endurance exercise. In: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 9.
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