Are the Multidimensional Body Self-Relations Questionnaire Scales stable or transient?

Alan M. Nevill, Andrew M. Lane, Michael J. Duncan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Body image is an important concept when assessing mental health and, thus, a target for intervention work. The common approach to assess body image is via self-report and, consequently, it is important to assess stability and susceptibility of items to random change. Participants (N = 99, aged: 18–30 years) completed the 34-item Multidimensional Body Self-Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales (MBSRQ-AS) twice, separated by two weeks. Stability was quantified by calculating the test–retest differences for each item, with a stable item showing 90% of respondents’ differences within a criterion of ≤±1. This method was used in preference to correlation, which is a test of association rather than agreement. Analyses identified 29 stable items. Five items were found to be unstable including the entire “Appearance Evaluation” scale. One particular unstable question, Q9 = “Most people would consider me good-looking”, revealed strong associations with both gender and weight status. Forty-four per cent of “overweight” respondents changed their minds by more than ±1 compared with only 10% of “normal-weight” participants, suggesting that being overweight is associated with uncertainty and instability. We suggest that future research is needed to investigate why such factors as being overweight appear to be linked to instability in self-report measures of body image. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 4th March 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02640414.2015.1018930
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1881-1889
    JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
    Volume33
    Issue number18
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2015

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    Body Image
    Self Report
    Weights and Measures
    Manuscripts
    Uncertainty
    Sports
    Mental Health
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Bibliographical note

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 4th March 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02640414.2015.1018930

    Keywords

    • test–retest
    • stability
    • psychometric instruments
    • bias
    • appearance evaluation
    • transient constructs

    Cite this

    Are the Multidimensional Body Self-Relations Questionnaire Scales stable or transient? / Nevill, Alan M.; Lane, Andrew M.; Duncan, Michael J.

    In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 33, No. 18, 04.03.2015, p. 1881-1889.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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