Are our streets safe enough for female users? How everyday harassment affects mobility

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

3 Citations (Scopus)
67 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper reports on the harassment women in a UK city face as they go about their everyday lives. It is argued that such experiences are not only traumatic, but have a long term effect on women’s sense of worth and on their mobility patterns. Looking at the transport system as a whole as required by new mobility paradigms and whole journey experiences, this may be seen as a perpetuating, deep-rooted system failure leading to inequality and reductions in inclusivity. After having summarised the results, the participants’ suggestions are put forward as solutions to address this issue.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on Ergonomics & Human Factors 2015
EditorsSarah Sharples, Steven Shorrock, Patrick Waterson
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages495-502
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9781138028036
Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2015
EventInternational Conference on Ergonomics & Human Factors 2015 - Daventry, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Apr 201516 Apr 2015

Publication series

NameContemporary Ergonomics
PublisherTaylor & Francis

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Ergonomics & Human Factors 2015
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityDaventry
Period13/04/1516/04/15

Keywords

  • street harassment
  • women
  • mobility

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  • Cite this

    Osmond, J., & Woodcock, A. (2015). Are our streets safe enough for female users? How everyday harassment affects mobility. In S. Sharples, S. Shorrock, & P. Waterson (Eds.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Ergonomics & Human Factors 2015 (1 ed., pp. 495-502). (Contemporary Ergonomics). Taylor & Francis.