Application of Ground-Air Heat Exchanger to Reduce Cooling Energy Demand of Low-Rise Office Building in Southeast of UK

Kenneth Ip, Abdullahi Ahmed, Andrew Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

The use of ground-air heat exchangers (GAHX) in a ventilation system is gaining recognition as a low or zero carbon ventilation strategy. However, there is very limited research and published data on the thermal performance of GAHX under UK climate. This research project currently undertaken at the University of Brighton aims to fill this gap in knowledge. The research evaluates the thermal performance of the GAHX - so called Earth tube - under different configurations, climatic and operating conditions in the UK. Thermal simulations have been carried out, using validated thermal models developed by others and the ground temperature and climatic variables established from this research, to predict the daily air supply conditions from GAHX and to evaluate the annual energy gain/saving potential. A low rise office building located in Brighton, Southeast of UK, is used as a case study to demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the GAHX. The issues related to the application of GAHX and the further research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceeding of Sustainable Building (SB08) Conference, At Melbourne Australia
Pages1244-1251
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)0646503723
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep 2008
EventWorld Sustainable Building Conference - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 21 Sep 200825 Sep 2008

Conference

ConferenceWorld Sustainable Building Conference
Abbreviated titleSB08
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period21/09/0825/09/08

Keywords

  • Ground-air heat exchanger
  • TRNSYS simulation
  • soil temperature
  • Low carbon technology
  • Earthtube

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    Ip, K., Ahmed, A., & Miller, A. (2008). Application of Ground-Air Heat Exchanger to Reduce Cooling Energy Demand of Low-Rise Office Building in Southeast of UK. In Proceeding of Sustainable Building (SB08) Conference, At Melbourne Australia (pp. 1244-1251)