'And the pain just disappeared into insignificance': The healing response in Lourdes - Performance, psychology and caring

S. Goldingay, P. Dieppe, Miguel Farias

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Three academic/practitioners from different disciplines (performance, medicine and psychology) describe the ways in which observing, and importantly, participating in the healing rituals of the French pilgrimage site of Lourdes challenged their ways of thinking about both their discipline's research approaches and their understandings of community, caring and healing. By positioning themselves as both first-person and third-person researchers, they suggest that a new type of 'trans-disciplinary', longitudinal, reflexively sensitive methodology is needed in order to investigate activities involving groups of people and spiritual practices as a whole system in order to better understand how they can positively affect our innate healing response.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)315-323
    JournalInternational Review of Psychiatry
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    Early online date22 Jun 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Pain
    Psychology
    Healing
    Lourdes
    Ritual Healing
    First Person
    Positioning
    Medicine
    Person
    Spiritual Practice
    Pilgrimage
    Methodology

    Cite this

    'And the pain just disappeared into insignificance' : The healing response in Lourdes - Performance, psychology and caring. / Goldingay, S.; Dieppe, P.; Farias, Miguel.

    In: International Review of Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2014, p. 315-323.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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