Analysing the take up of Battery Electric Vehicles: An investigation of barriers amongst drivers in the UK

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Abstract

The stream of announcements in 2017, effectively banning the production and sales of internal combustion engine vehicles within the next fifteen-twenty years, indicate how governments are seeking to regulate a mass market transition to electric vehicles. Yet despite significant policy initiatives to stimulate their uptake, EV market share remains far short of the level required to push them into the mainstream. This paper identifies a multitude of potential barriers to uptake and investigates these from the largely ignored perspective of mass market drivers of ICE vehicles in a European context. In addition it assesses the extent to which barriers are inter-related, and can be reduced down to larger explanatory ‘factors’. Findings, drawn from an original survey of 26,000 motorists suggest that resistance to EV adoption is characterised by twelve barriers that can be reduced and conceptualised as ‘economic uncertainty’ and ‘socio-technical’ factors. In turn, economic uncertainty was found to be significantly associated with age and geography, whilst socio-technical issues are related to gender. Problems of EV adoption are shown to be complex and multi-faceted, not easily solved by tackling individual issues, but requiring a more holistic ecosystem approach, the key policy components of which are posited in this paper. Such analysis is significant in enriching academic discourse and informing effective strategy and policy that will facilitate the transition to EVs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)466-481
Number of pages16
JournalTransportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment
Volume63
Early online date26 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

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electric vehicle
driver
uncertainty
Economics
holistic approach
market
market share
Electric vehicles
Internal combustion engines
Ecosystems
sales
economics
market transition
Sales
ecosystem approach
geography
discourse
gender
battery
policy

Bibliographical note

NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment ,63, (2018) DOI:10.1016/j.trd.2018.06.016

© 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • battery electric vehicles, barriers, economic uncertainty, socio-technical issues, EV ecosystem
  • EV ecosystem

Cite this

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title = "Analysing the take up of Battery Electric Vehicles: An investigation of barriers amongst drivers in the UK",
abstract = "The stream of announcements in 2017, effectively banning the production and sales of internal combustion engine vehicles within the next fifteen-twenty years, indicate how governments are seeking to regulate a mass market transition to electric vehicles. Yet despite significant policy initiatives to stimulate their uptake, EV market share remains far short of the level required to push them into the mainstream. This paper identifies a multitude of potential barriers to uptake and investigates these from the largely ignored perspective of mass market drivers of ICE vehicles in a European context. In addition it assesses the extent to which barriers are inter-related, and can be reduced down to larger explanatory ‘factors’. Findings, drawn from an original survey of 26,000 motorists suggest that resistance to EV adoption is characterised by twelve barriers that can be reduced and conceptualised as ‘economic uncertainty’ and ‘socio-technical’ factors. In turn, economic uncertainty was found to be significantly associated with age and geography, whilst socio-technical issues are related to gender. Problems of EV adoption are shown to be complex and multi-faceted, not easily solved by tackling individual issues, but requiring a more holistic ecosystem approach, the key policy components of which are posited in this paper. Such analysis is significant in enriching academic discourse and informing effective strategy and policy that will facilitate the transition to EVs.",
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author = "N Berkeley and David Jarvis and Andrew Jones",
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N2 - The stream of announcements in 2017, effectively banning the production and sales of internal combustion engine vehicles within the next fifteen-twenty years, indicate how governments are seeking to regulate a mass market transition to electric vehicles. Yet despite significant policy initiatives to stimulate their uptake, EV market share remains far short of the level required to push them into the mainstream. This paper identifies a multitude of potential barriers to uptake and investigates these from the largely ignored perspective of mass market drivers of ICE vehicles in a European context. In addition it assesses the extent to which barriers are inter-related, and can be reduced down to larger explanatory ‘factors’. Findings, drawn from an original survey of 26,000 motorists suggest that resistance to EV adoption is characterised by twelve barriers that can be reduced and conceptualised as ‘economic uncertainty’ and ‘socio-technical’ factors. In turn, economic uncertainty was found to be significantly associated with age and geography, whilst socio-technical issues are related to gender. Problems of EV adoption are shown to be complex and multi-faceted, not easily solved by tackling individual issues, but requiring a more holistic ecosystem approach, the key policy components of which are posited in this paper. Such analysis is significant in enriching academic discourse and informing effective strategy and policy that will facilitate the transition to EVs.

AB - The stream of announcements in 2017, effectively banning the production and sales of internal combustion engine vehicles within the next fifteen-twenty years, indicate how governments are seeking to regulate a mass market transition to electric vehicles. Yet despite significant policy initiatives to stimulate their uptake, EV market share remains far short of the level required to push them into the mainstream. This paper identifies a multitude of potential barriers to uptake and investigates these from the largely ignored perspective of mass market drivers of ICE vehicles in a European context. In addition it assesses the extent to which barriers are inter-related, and can be reduced down to larger explanatory ‘factors’. Findings, drawn from an original survey of 26,000 motorists suggest that resistance to EV adoption is characterised by twelve barriers that can be reduced and conceptualised as ‘economic uncertainty’ and ‘socio-technical’ factors. In turn, economic uncertainty was found to be significantly associated with age and geography, whilst socio-technical issues are related to gender. Problems of EV adoption are shown to be complex and multi-faceted, not easily solved by tackling individual issues, but requiring a more holistic ecosystem approach, the key policy components of which are posited in this paper. Such analysis is significant in enriching academic discourse and informing effective strategy and policy that will facilitate the transition to EVs.

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