An integrated care pathway for menorrhagia across the primary–secondary interface: patients’ experience, clinical outcomes, and service utilisation

S. Julian, N. J. Naftalin, M. Clark, Ala Szczepura, A. Rashid, R. Baker, N. Taub, M. Habiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: “Referral” characterises a significant area of interaction between primary and secondary care. Despite advantages, it can be inflexible, and may lead to duplication. Objective: To examine the outcomes of an integrated model that lends weight to general practitioner (GP)-led evidence based care. Design: A prospective, non-random comparison of two services: women attending the new (Bridges) pathway compared with those attending a consultant-led one-stop menstrual clinic (OSMC). Patients’ views were examined using patient career diaries, health and clinical outcomes, and resource utilisation. Follow-up was for 8 months. Setting: A large teaching hospital and general practices within one primary care trust (PCT). Results: Between March 2002 and June 2004, 99 women in the Bridges pathway were compared with 94 women referred to the OSMC by GPs from non-participating PCTs. The patient career diary demonstrated a significant improvement in the Bridges group for patient information, fitting in at the point of arrangements made for the patient to attend hospital (ease of access) (p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-115
Number of pages6
JournalQuality and Safety in Health Care
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Menorrhagia
Primary Health Care
Secondary Care
Consultants
Teaching Hospitals
General Practice
General Practitioners
Medical Records
Referral and Consultation
Weights and Measures

Bibliographical note

The full text is available from: http://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/16/2/110.full.pdf+html

Cite this

An integrated care pathway for menorrhagia across the primary–secondary interface: patients’ experience, clinical outcomes, and service utilisation. / Julian, S.; Naftalin, N. J.; Clark, M.; Szczepura, Ala; Rashid, A.; Baker, R.; Taub, N.; Habiba, M.

In: Quality and Safety in Health Care, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2007, p. 110-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Julian, S. ; Naftalin, N. J. ; Clark, M. ; Szczepura, Ala ; Rashid, A. ; Baker, R. ; Taub, N. ; Habiba, M. / An integrated care pathway for menorrhagia across the primary–secondary interface: patients’ experience, clinical outcomes, and service utilisation. In: Quality and Safety in Health Care. 2007 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 110-115.
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