An Impact of Engine Downsizing on Change of Engine Weight

Maciej Piotr Cieslak, Zbigniew Sroka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One of the trends for development of internal combustion engine is downsizing, which in its final form leads to reduction of fuel consumption and limitation of carbon dioxide concentration in the exhaust gases. The obvious effect of reducing the volume of a cylinder is to reduce the dimensions of the various components, e.g. piston with rings and pin, connecting rod, crankshaft, engine block etc. Changes of geometric dimensions also affect the change in mass of each element and consequently − the whole engine. Expected weight reduction will be a benefit in considering downsizing techniques as another significant development trend in automotive applications associated with a reduction in the weight of the complete vehicle – called “light weight vehicle”. The paper discusses the various forms of downsizing (by stroke, by diameter and mix) and their impacts on the changes in engine mass. The engine Subaru Flat 4, constructed with standard components in terms of design and materials was tested by virtual recognition in mass changes. Original drawings of components and sets have been simplified by for example does not account for chamfers and chops. When calculating also omitted the weight of typical accessories (e.g. fuel lines or electronic components), assuming that each considered option has the same equipment. The highest change in the weight of minus 7.27 % relative to the standard engine was done with downsizing by diameter and smallest one (-6.09 %) by downsizing mix.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-219
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Kones Powertrain and Transport
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Engines
Light weight vehicles
Connecting rods
Crankshafts
Accessories
Engine cylinders
Exhaust gases
Internal combustion engines
Fuel consumption
Pistons
Carbon dioxide

Keywords

  • combustion engine
  • downsizing
  • weight change

Cite this

An Impact of Engine Downsizing on Change of Engine Weight. / Cieslak, Maciej Piotr; Sroka, Zbigniew.

In: Journal of Kones Powertrain and Transport, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.07.2015, p. 213-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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