An Evolutionary Psychology Perspective on Physical Exercise Motives: Implications for Social Marketing

N. Michaelidou, Caroline Moraes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)
    15 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This study uses the theoretical framework of evolutionary psychology to examine the motives driving physical exercise behavior, as evolutionary psychology is still under-explored in the social marketing literature. The study employs a survey that draws on a sample of 220 participants. Independent sample t-tests and analysis of variance are conducted, and findings show significant sex and marital status differences in terms of motivations to exercise. Research findings have original implications for social marketing interventions that seek to understand physical exercise motivations and to encourage increased levels of physical exercise. Further, findings contribute to the extant literature by establishing the importance of sex-based segmentation strategies and message appeals that resonate with specific segments' innate physical exercise motives Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing on 21st May 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10495142.2013.872500 .
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)162-183
    JournalJournal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing
    Volume26
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

    Bibliographical note

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing on 21st May 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10495142.2013.872500 .

    Keywords

    • evolutionary psychology
    • physical exercise
    • social marketing

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