Age-Friendly Housing Environments

Karim Hadjri, Tulika Gadakari, Junjie Huang, Jingjing Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The world population is ageing owing to rising longevity and declining fertility rate. More older people are nowadays living alone in housing that is generally not adapted to their new needs and requirements. Evidence suggests that the majority of older people want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible to retain a sense of familiarity and independence which has shown positive effects on people’s overall health and wellbeing. Responding to this trend, the large mainstream housing stock needs to be easily retrofitted with the intervention of technology such that it can respond to older people’s changing needs.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place
Publisher University of Sheffield
Pages14-19
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

housing
world population
fertility rate
trend
health
evidence

Cite this

Hadjri, K., Gadakari, T., Huang, J., & Wang, J. (2018). Age-Friendly Housing Environments. In ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place (pp. 14-19). University of Sheffield.

Age-Friendly Housing Environments. / Hadjri, Karim; Gadakari, Tulika; Huang, Junjie; Wang, Jingjing.

ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place. University of Sheffield, 2018. p. 14-19.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hadjri, K, Gadakari, T, Huang, J & Wang, J 2018, Age-Friendly Housing Environments. in ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place. University of Sheffield, pp. 14-19.
Hadjri K, Gadakari T, Huang J, Wang J. Age-Friendly Housing Environments. In ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place. University of Sheffield. 2018. p. 14-19
Hadjri, Karim ; Gadakari, Tulika ; Huang, Junjie ; Wang, Jingjing. / Age-Friendly Housing Environments. ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place. University of Sheffield, 2018. pp. 14-19
@inbook{903b1d4e16694c88aa44bc2cd5cd414d,
title = "Age-Friendly Housing Environments",
abstract = "The world population is ageing owing to rising longevity and declining fertility rate. More older people are nowadays living alone in housing that is generally not adapted to their new needs and requirements. Evidence suggests that the majority of older people want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible to retain a sense of familiarity and independence which has shown positive effects on people’s overall health and wellbeing. Responding to this trend, the large mainstream housing stock needs to be easily retrofitted with the intervention of technology such that it can respond to older people’s changing needs.",
author = "Karim Hadjri and Tulika Gadakari and Junjie Huang and Jingjing Wang",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
language = "English",
pages = "14--19",
booktitle = "ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place",
publisher = "University of Sheffield",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Age-Friendly Housing Environments

AU - Hadjri, Karim

AU - Gadakari, Tulika

AU - Huang, Junjie

AU - Wang, Jingjing

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - The world population is ageing owing to rising longevity and declining fertility rate. More older people are nowadays living alone in housing that is generally not adapted to their new needs and requirements. Evidence suggests that the majority of older people want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible to retain a sense of familiarity and independence which has shown positive effects on people’s overall health and wellbeing. Responding to this trend, the large mainstream housing stock needs to be easily retrofitted with the intervention of technology such that it can respond to older people’s changing needs.

AB - The world population is ageing owing to rising longevity and declining fertility rate. More older people are nowadays living alone in housing that is generally not adapted to their new needs and requirements. Evidence suggests that the majority of older people want to remain in their own homes for as long as possible to retain a sense of familiarity and independence which has shown positive effects on people’s overall health and wellbeing. Responding to this trend, the large mainstream housing stock needs to be easily retrofitted with the intervention of technology such that it can respond to older people’s changing needs.

UR - https://www.housinglin.org.uk/_assets/Resources/Housing/OtherOrganisation/OdessaConferencePublicationFeb2018.pdf

M3 - Chapter

SP - 14

EP - 19

BT - ODESSA: Optimising Care Delivery Models to Support Ageing-in-Place

PB - University of Sheffield

ER -