ADDRESSING CRASH AND REPEATED SHOCK SAFETY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS OF FAST CRAFT

T. Dobbins, T. Thompson, S. McCartan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Abstract

There have been many examples of fast craft occupants suffering serious injury and sometimes, unfortunately, fatal consequences. Even with these results little has been done to address the risks to the occupants. Other forms of transport, e.g. automotive and aviation, have invested significant resources in crash safety for any years. Unfortunately a crash in a fast craft is reminiscent of a 1960’s car crash where seat belts weren’t mandatory. Accident reports illustrate this risk; There were multiple injuries to Mr Thomson’s chest, which resulted in severe internal bleeding. The forensic pathologist reported that the injuries were consistent with a heavy impact against a hard surface, such as a cockpit or wheel. Similarly where occupants are exposed to the harsh repeated shock environment there are many examples of musculoskeletal injuries being experienced as the individuals impact with the internal structures of the vessel. The development and use of the Crash Analysis Matrixdefines the nine interaction areas that are examined to identify issues and develop design and operational solutions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventMarine Design - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 2 Sep 20153 Sep 2015

Conference

ConferenceMarine Design
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period2/09/153/09/15

Fingerprint

Aviation
Wheels
Accidents
Railroad cars

Bibliographical note

This paper is not available on the repository. it was given at the Marine Design conference, 2-3 September 2015, London, UK

Cite this

Dobbins, T., Thompson, T., & McCartan, S. (2015). ADDRESSING CRASH AND REPEATED SHOCK SAFETY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS OF FAST CRAFT. In Unknown Host Publication

ADDRESSING CRASH AND REPEATED SHOCK SAFETY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS OF FAST CRAFT. / Dobbins, T.; Thompson, T.; McCartan, S.

Unknown Host Publication. 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Dobbins, T, Thompson, T & McCartan, S 2015, ADDRESSING CRASH AND REPEATED SHOCK SAFETY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS OF FAST CRAFT. in Unknown Host Publication. Marine Design, London, United Kingdom, 2/09/15.
Dobbins, T. ; Thompson, T. ; McCartan, S. / ADDRESSING CRASH AND REPEATED SHOCK SAFETY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS OF FAST CRAFT. Unknown Host Publication. 2015.
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